Category Archives: Newsletter

Newsletter Vol 37 / Issue 06

Greetings

Well, it doesn’t seem to matter if the 3rd Tuesday falls early or late, I always seem to get caught by surprise.

I’d like to give a shout out to Gary Runyan. The programming this year has been excellent! I’m looking forward to the program on duck calls. I’m having a hard time keeping mine in a row.

A reminder about Show and Tell – I know it’s hot in the shop (my air conditioner is a Harbor Freight pedestal fan) but get out there early and crank out something to bring on the 21st.

Let’s better get started with SPLINTERS.

May 2022 Meeting

David Mathis presented a very informative program on the Gallagher Guitar Company past present and future. He brought one of the early Gallagher guitars and well as one of the latest. It’s good to know the quality of the original company is being carried on.

June 2022 Meeting

We will have our next meeting on Tuesday, June 21st. Our program will be presented by Fred Roe on making Reel Foot Lake Duck Calls

One-on-one Sharpening

Gary Runyon is offering one-on-one classes on sharpening scrapers and planes at his shop by appointment. Contact Gary via email to set day and time. deertracefarm@gmail.com

May 2022 Show & Tell

Here are the items that were shown in last month’s Zoom/Live meeting. There were only two items brought. That make’s for a short meeting and a short newsletter. So, get to work guys and give me something to write about.

Darrell Albert made several Chittum burls items and finished them with walnut oil.

John Hartin turned lidded pin oak bowls and finished them with oil and varnish.

Internet Links of Interest

  • WOOD Magazine has a short article on “Foolproof Finishes.” They probably don’t know how competent a fool I am <grin>.
  • I can’t remember if someone sent me this link or if I just stumbled on it. There’s a tire company in Chattanooga, Corker Tire Company, that specializes in tires for antique cars. They have expanded their product line to include wooden spoked rims.
  • It may not be too late to sign up for the AAW Symposium in Chattanooga!

Carver’s Corner

The Splinter Carvers continue to meet first and third Saturdays of the month from 8:30 am to 10:30 am (whether Jim’s there or not).  The shop is located at 201 Jolliffe Acres Ln, Tullahoma. Tools and wood are available at the meetings, just bring yourself and try your hand at carving!

Sweeping Up

Two tech funnies – kinda.

Watch out for SPLINTERS!

Submissions to the newsletter are more than welcomed. Send funnies, tips, or other content that may be of interest and you may see it in a future edition of SPLINTERS

Newsletter Vol 37 / Issue 05

Greetings

Friday the 13th is my birthday. I’ll be seventy years old. I can tell you getting old is not for sissies. But, as far as I know, there’s no good alternative to getting old. So, I’m praying for good legs, that my back will hold up, my mind will stay clear, and I’ll have a lot more days with my family and in the shop.

We’d better get started with SPLINTERS.

April 2022 Meeting

The following is from the April minutes found on the website:

 The program started by recognizing members of Tom’s family in attendance. Darren Earle gave a brief resume of Tom’s work and pointed out a number of Tom’s work here on display. Tom was one of the original members who started our club in 1985. He along with Henry Davis, Ross Roepke and 5 others attended first meetings. Showed a picture of Tom’s first tool, a scroll saw Tom owned at age 11. Some of items on display included a scale model of a spinning wheel he made and gave to his teacher. She gave it back when she retired. Windsor chairs, carved sea chest, spinning wheel, large plan drawings and number of other items. Darren and other members talked about his use of nail method of decorating items, cutting dovetails by hand and making his own tools. Showed lots of pics of Tom’s works including Good Shepherd Church Baptismal Font, Woodward House furniture refinished, and many others. Tom was a great teacher. He really enjoyed sharing and working with kids. Tom was a talented woodworker, turner, and teacher. Tom’s daughter, Emily, told of secret compartment in a cabinet her dad made for her. He often asked if she ever opened and she told him no. Later it was discovered that he had left her and her two daughters a secret message in the compartment. The program was a great success and all appreciated by Tom’s family in attendance.

Editor’s note – I’d like to mention a group of Tom’s work that I found fascinating – his Civil War reproductions. He made folding chairs, officer’s field desks and many other items. The one I liked best was the canteens he turned as 2 dished sides and then assembled. I don’t remember the process, but I thought it pretty neat.

May 2022 Meeting

We will have our next meeting on Tuesday, May 17th from 6:30-8:30.  David Mathis from Gallagher Guitars will discuss making guitars with woods indigenous to Tennessee.

One-on-one Sharpening

Gary Runyon is offering one-on-one classes on sharpening scrapers and planes at his shop by appointment. Contact Gary via email to set day and time. deertracefarm@gmail.com

April 2022 Show & Tell

Here are the items that were shown in last month’s Zoom/Live meeting.

Ken Gould sent pics of few projects. 1) Double cottonwood bark carving with electric burning detail on oak mounting boards. Explained burning technique using a solution of baking soda and vinegar and high voltage probes at different spots on the boards to create a fractal effect. 2) Turned bowl burned with the same process.  Pretty diamond willow walking stick.

Tony Murphy showed pics of 2 sideboards he made. Plan was featured in Fine Woodworking which he modified to fit in his designated house spaces. Made of white oak with stain and shellac finish. (Pic1, Pic2, Pic3, Pic4, Pic5)

Fred Heltsley spoke of items he saw in Maui, Hi. Bottle nose dolphin wall sculpture of monkey pod explained what carving represents. No finish. Eastern red cedar bowl from Sandra Bailey, finish Odie’s Oil and polish. Todd Campbell twice turned bowl with a lacquer oil mix, then hand rubbed. Todd Campbell has 9 month twice turning process. Pics of shop and lathe that can handle very large pieces. (Pic4, Pic5, Pic6) For more information visit: Toddcampbellwoodworks.com.

Jim Jolliffe had a carving of a wood spirit from a pine knot finished with rattle-can satin lacquer.

He also showed a couple red oak burl power carved vessels. (Pic3)Used power grinder with various bits/wheels. Finished with Howard’s Butcher Block Conditioner.

Gary Runyon brought osage orange threaded box with spinning wheel dizes inside. Each diz was from different woods including from mesquite, red bud, maple, and cherry and finished with Dr Woodshop walnut oil and shellac.

Paul Jalbert displayed a take apart rocker from plan he obtained at a previous meeting. Made out of cherry and finished with Danish oil. He carved his nephew’s name in the chair’s back and painted the letter grooves and acrylic paint. He shared a tip to use yellow paint when doing paint highlights for color blind persons as they can see yellow best.

Vince Zaccardi talked about table saw jig he brought. Explained clamping wood to obtain any angle.

James Rice had three items for show and tell.

  1. Had pics of hutch he made for his daughter-in-law. Made of oak with golden oak finish.
  2. Pic of crocheted flag that he made frame to hold. It was mounted to plywood using double sided tape. To be placed in Lulu’s Restaurant in Estill Springs.
  3. Small embroidery rolling cart with spindles to hold up to 216 spools of thread. Explained procedure of building including jig made to hold wood while drilling.

Chuck Taylor showed mushrooms done by offset turning. Made of spalted maple and lacquer finish.

He had a cherry bowl made by Tom Cowan with rim decorated by Tom’s nail method. Also showed a miniature English tilt top table Tom made of cherry and finished with lacquer.

Janie Lovett brought her spinning wheel Tom Cowan made for her. She uses it at Falls Mill to demonstrate spinning. Made with maple, ash and cherry. There was also a small spinning wheel made by Tom on display.

Richard Gulley had sign made from request by Fred Heltsley. Sign said Raus Kitchen In Loving Memory of Lewis E. Rittenhouse. Black matte for CNC still adhered to the top of the wood.  Wood was unfinished.

Internet Links of Interest

Thanks to Fred Heltsley for the links to two Hawaian woodworkers:

Loyd Ackerman created a video of the PowerPoint presentation of Tom Cowan’s work. I posted it on our YouTube channel.

Carver’s Corner

The Splinter Carvers continue to meet first and third Saturdays of the month from 8:30 am to 10:30 am (whether Jim’s there or not).  The shop is located at 201 Jolliffe Acres Ln, Tullahoma. Tools and wood are available at the meetings, just bring yourself and try your hand at carving!

Sweeping Up

This month’s funnies:

Watch out for SPLINTERS!

Submissions to the newsletter are more than welcomed. Send funnies, tips, or other content that may be of interest and you may see it in a future edition of SPLINTERS.

Newsletter Vol 37 / Issue 04

Greetings

I had brunch today (April 11) with Paul Jalbert, Vince Zacardi, and Jack Kincella. We had a little going away gathering for Jack. Several others were supposed to attend but were providentially hindered. This has already been said by several in several different ways, but I’ll add mine. Jack has been a blessing to me and a great asset to the club.

His finishing skills border on magic, but he thinks anyone ought to be able to do it. He told me he apprenticed under his dad, so I think it’s genetic.

We’d better get started with SPLINTERS.

 March 2022 Meeting

Jack told club he will soon be moving and how much he had enjoyed the club. Using a picture of a table he made he walked through epoxy process. He recommends Stone Coat Counter tops for product and free training videos. There are many uses for epoxy finishes including doors, coasters, tables, cutting boards and picture frames.

April 2022 Meeting

We will have our next meeting on Tuesday, April 19th from 6:30-8:30.  Darren Earle will give a presentation of Tom Cowan’s work. He was a very prolific woodworker. Tom was also a cofounder of our wood club.

One-on-one Sharpening

Gary Runyon is offering one-on-one classes on sharpening scrapers and planes at his shop by appointment. Contact Gary via email to set day and time. deertracefarm@gmail.com

March 2022 Show & Tell

Here are the items that were shown in last month’s Zoom/Live meeting.

Paul Jalbert had pictures of Little Free Library stands made by the club for Franklin County Friends of Library. Showed picture of one donated to Tims Ford State Park.

Jim Jolliffe with aid of pictures showed his update to bench top dust collector. Replaced squirrel cage motor with second hand fan motor making unit much lighter and quieter.

Bob Truesdale displayed a lidded bowl made of walnut and finished with lacquer. He explained thumbnail carvings along sides. Bob had some plastic drawers to give away to anyone who wanted.

Joe Ferraro brought a bowl he made from wood his friend in Winchester gave him. Made of Maple and finished with lacquer.

Fred Heltsey showed a jig he made for burning wood turnings by heating different wire gauges. He explained how to use to burn lines in wood. He also had a display of his son’s collection of Jenga blocks of large selection of wood collected over time. Fred had a piece of yellow wood of a tree that fell at his home. Yellow throughout and wanted know if anyone could identify.

Richard Gulley brought a sign made on CNC. “My mind still thinks I’m 25. My body thinks my mind is an IDIOT”. Made for Henry Davis’ wife.

 Internet Links of Interest

Thanks to Pete Miller for this article on saving space in the shop.

Here’s a WOOD article on making cabinets the easy way

 Carver’s Corner

The Splinter Carvers continue to meet first and third Saturdays of the month from 8:30 am to 10:30 am (whether Jim’s there or not).  The shop is located at 201 Jolliffe Acres Ln, Tullahoma. Tools and wood are available at the meetings, just bring yourself and try your hand at carving!

Sweeping Up

This month’s picture in not for the funny bone. I think Ross Roepke sent it to me. It’s a book bench at a library in Ukraine. I pray it’s still there. Say a special prayer for those people fighting for their homes.

Watch out for SPLINTERS!

Submissions to the newsletter are more than welcomed. Send funnies, tips, or other content that may be of interest and you may see it in a future edition of SPLINTERS.

Newsletter Vol 37 / Issue 03

Greetings

I apologize for the newsletter being late this month. It’s hard to believe the third Tuesday is here so soon. Maybe it has something to do with the time change. I don’t ever recall springing forward a whole week though. It’s the 2nd Monday as I start composing this, but tomorrow is 3rd Tuesday. Go figure.

We’d better get started with SPLINTERS.

February 2022 Meeting

Club member Sam Clark gave an outstanding program on machine tool maintenance with a plethora of tips and tricks. The presentation slides are located on the club website

March 2022 Meeting

We will have our next meeting on Tuesday, February 15th from 6:30-8:30.  Jack Kincella will present Building a River Table using Epoxy. Jack has constructed several epoxy/wood projects and will share his experiences with us.

BTW, Jack’s Feb 19th seminar on refinishing can be seen on our YouTube channel. Thanks to Loyd Ackerman for videoing the event and editing the video.

February 2022 Show & Tell

Here are the items that were shown in last month’s Zoom/Live meeting.

Matt Brothers showed a craftsman style night stand he made for his daughter to match her bed. It is made of oak and has a single drawer with dovetail joints. It is finished with Danish Oil and lacquer.

Matt showed a 4’ x 12’ walnut table that he modified to strengthen the top. The table was built by his customer. The top’s only support was the table’s apron. As a result, the table top sagged ½ to ¾” in the middle of the table. To help flatten the top, Matt placed 3 stringers perpendicular to the length of the table and clamped the table top and the stringers. Matt then took angle iron bracing and mounted it to the table apron and secured the stringers to the angle iron. The table top deflection is less than ¼” over the 4’ width!

Matt also built a kitchen cart out of the hickory island top “sink cutout” of the island top he presented in November. The cart is finished with Danish Oil and lacquer.

Tony Murphy attended two 1-week classes, each week separated by 3 months, at Marc Adams’ Woodworking School to build a Michael Fortune #1 Steam Bent Chair. The chair is made of solid walnut and had many steam bent features. He noted that only one piece in the chair was straight! He finished the chair with yellow die, pecan gel stain and oil-varnish.

Bryan Gordon made two custom “chimney picture” lamps for his wife. He turned the lamp base out of pecan wood. He used lamp shades from a ceiling fan and bought led fixtures and glass sleeves that held personal photos and slid over the lamp base. He finished the lamps with oil and wax.

Peter Hunter turned a nested bowl set for eating pistachios and “catching” the shells. The pistachios rest in the top/inside bowl. Once the pistachio is freed from the shells, the spent shells are put in the bottom/outside bowl via three large slots. The inside bowl was made of European beech and the bottom bowl from soft maple. Both were finished with Shellawax.

Rodney Holder went to a one week wood-turning class at John C Campbell Folk School. He turned a variety of segmented pieces including a wine-stopper, pepper mill, ice cream scoop and rolling pin. They all turned out beautifully!

Jim Jolliffe carved a cottonwood bark house “in the round”. He jointed two pieces of bark and them lightly glued the jointed backs with water-soluble Elmer’s School Glue and a page of magazine paper to allow easier separation. He carved all the outside details, then split the two halves. He hollowed out the halves so one could see through the windows. Once hollowed, he fully glued the two halves together and cleaned up the outer details. He sprayed the carving with two coats of satin rattle-can lacquer and then applied a single coat of Watco’s Natural Colored Liquid wax. After 10 minutes of liquid wax application, he wiped off the excess and buffed the remaining wax with a rotary brush. (Pic2)

Internet Links of Interest

This month I have an article from Fine Woodworking about the use of an L fence on the table saw.

Carver’s Corner

The Splinter Carvers continue to meet first and third Saturdays of the month from 8:30 am to 10:30 am (whether Jim’s there or not).  The shop is located at 201 Jolliffe Acres Ln, Tullahoma. Tools and wood are available at the meetings, just bring yourself and try your hand at carving!

Sweeping Up

I don’t know if these trees really like each other, or maybe there’s a couple Tennessee Valley Woodworkers close by! Thanks to Ross Roepke.

Two signs that have to do with the current economy.

   

Watch out for SPLINTERS!

Submissions to the newsletter are more than welcomed. Send funnies, tips, or other content that may be of interest and you may see it in a future edition of SPLINTERS.

Newsletter Vol 37 / Issue 02

Greetings

Thanks to all who’ve checked in to ask about the surgery. It went well, all in all. I go back for the follow up on the 14th. I hope to work in a nice lunch with my Valentine. She’s gone above and beyond the call this past week.

I’m having somewhat of a hard time getting back in newsletter mode. This issue may be abbreviated.

Let’s get started with SPLINTERS!

January 2022 Meeting

I missed the January meeting. Senility hits hard sometimes. Looks like Dan Farr had a great presentation of the Grandmother Clock build.

 February 2022 Meeting

We will have our next meeting on Tuesday, February 15th from 6:30-8:30.  Sam Clark will be discussing machine maintenance.

January 2022 Show & Tell

Here are the items that were shown in last month’s Zoom/Live meeting.

John Hartin started making Scandinavian spoons. He used box elder and showed rough cut using band-saw. Explained making curve using 2” reliever. He said do inside of spoon before finishing outside. Used sanding drum to do turns. He had a finished spoon for display. He finished spoon with penetrating finish he makes.

Chuck Taylor displayed a small hollow vessel which is very thin. Made of holly with gloss lacquer finish. He also had a small portable tic-tac-toe game. Made in two parts held together with magnets. Finish satin lacquer.

Matt Brothers with aid of slides showed a couple projects he worked on for clients. A piano bench of white oak. Finish brown mahogany with a leather top. (Pic1, Pic2, Pic3)
He had slides of a butterfly dining room table he got stripped. He repaired. Said table was well built. Looked great. (Pic1, Pic2,Pic3,Pic4,Pic5, Pic6)

Jim Jolliffe showed two carvings of gnomes for friends. A gnome Santa with no eyes, no shoes and added mouth and ponytail. Another is a Santa moon and star made for friend to match one they already have. Used Dremel to help with design. Both made of basswood and initially sealed with boiled linseed oil. Will paint with acrylic paint and spray matte finish.

Internet Links of Interest

Here’s a couple tips from WOOD magazine:

 Carver’s Corner

The Splinter Carvers continue to meet first and third Saturdays of the month from 8:30 am to 10:30 am (whether Jim’s there or not).  The shop is located at 201 Jolliffe Acres Ln, Tullahoma. Tools and wood are available at the meetings, just bring yourself and try your hand at carving!

Sweeping Up

I found a couple funnies for you.

For those who plan to clean your shop this winter. Maybe not so funny, but true.

 

Watch out for SPLINTERS!

Submissions to the newsletter are more than welcomed. Send funnies, tips, or other content that may be of interest and you may see it in a future edition of SPLINTERS.

Newsletter Vol 37 / Issue 01

Greetings

I have high hopes that 2022 is going to be an improvement over 2021. Not that last year wasn’t an improvement over 2020. There does seem to be some change for the better. I saw a quote the other day to the effect “when I said ‘things couldn’t get much worse’, I didn’t mean that as a challenge.” So, I’m crossing my fingers, praying hard, and hoping for a good year. Let’s get started with SPLINTERS!

December 2021 Meeting

The Super Show & Tell was great! Considering the duress and distress that everybody is going through, it’s amazing that you still turn out such great work.

January 2022 Meeting

We will have our next meeting on Tuesday, January 18th from 6:30-8:30.  Don Farr will be showing his process for building a grandmother clock.

December 2021 Show & Tell

Here are the items that were shown in last month’s Zoom/Live meeting. I don’t know if you’ve noticed but the “timing” of the Show & Tell Pics has gotten off. When we weren’t meeting, the newsletter described the items for that month. Once we started meeting again, the newsletter described pictures of the items shown the previous month. For example, the Gallery named 2021-12Dec on the website contains the pictures from November. If I can find a way to correct that’s not too labor intensive, I’ll fix it. If not, …

 However, it you view the online newsletters, the links lead to the correct items. Now on to Show & Tell.

Jim Jolliffe showed a Santa ornament, star & moon Santa ornaments, a bark house ornament and a cottonwood bark wood spirit. The Santa ornaments are basswood finished with BLO, acrylic paint highlights and lacquer.  The bark ornament was finished with lacquer and acrylic paint highlights.  The wood spirit hair and beard were sprayed with lacquer.  The face remained natural.

Larry Wendland showed a spalted birch serving tray finished with wipe on poly.  He also showed several highly colored box elder turnings from wood he gathered in Wisconsin and finished with wipe on poly.

Chris Sautter showed one of 14 “tanto style” pencil boxes he made out of cherry for his grandkids.  He went to a local trophy shop to get laser etching applied to the lids.  The boxes hold 12 colored pencils and have a “secret” compartment that the kids enjoy!  The boxes are finished in Danish Oil. Chris also showed one of 12 cutting boards he made from cherry, walnut, and maple “cutoff” pieces. The boards were finished with Walrus Oil.

Mickey Knowles showed bowl he made from butternut with walnut and pine laminated strips that were both horizontal (aligned with the bowl edge) and vertical through one half of the bowl!  The inspiration was from a bowl he saw 7-8 years ago.  It turned out beautifully.  He finished the bowl with sanding sealer and lacquer.  Mickey showed “inverse turned” tulips that begin with 3.5” square by 13” long blocks.  He used maple and walnut for the flowers and colored them with artisan dyes. The stems were made from dogwood.  The flowers were finished with Minwax. Mickey also showed two different tops he made.  One has a ball bearing that spins for a LONG time!  His other top, without a ball bearing, still spins well. (Picture)

John Hartin brought something old, something new, something borrowed and something blue to show.  Something old was his paternal grandfather’s draw knife that was forged from a wagon box bolt to become the drawknife.  The village blacksmith forged the blade! You could see one end of the knife still had the threads from the wagon box bolt!

Something new was a wooden cross that symbolized the new life one can gain through Jesus Christ.

Something borrowed was a turned, lidded box from a North Carolina woodturner John met at the John C. Campbell Folk School.  The lid’s knob and box bottom was made of cherry. The lid was made of pear wood.  The lid had coffee grounds as dimensional treatment.

Something blue was a Scandinavian “blue spalted” maple spoon.

Paul Jalbert showed a pair of bi-planes he made from patterns in the Great All American Wooden Toy Book.  He made the two identical planes from cherry with acrylic paint highlights and finished in Danish Oil.  Because they are identical, he included unique tail numbers for each of them.

Henry Davis showed an antique cherry magazine rack he made in 1954 as a high school sophomore in wood shop!  The rack had survived well.  He was unsure of the finish applied some 67 years ago.

Darren Earle showed a beautiful, large turned and bleached maple bowl.  The source of the wood was a tree that had been dead, standing for 30 years!  The lesson he learned was that the depth of the bowl drives tool stability challenges.  The tool flexes when far away from the tool rest and can break under the turning stress!  The “win” was that the bowl turned out smooth and round.  He applied a shellac finish.

Gary Runyon showed a curly cherry “cricket table” with three triangular drop leaves.  The table would allow the user to carry the table to the cricket match and set up to enjoy tea or other beverages during the match.  He applied Minwax Antique Oil finished and thought that would work for this end table.  He noted there were spots on the top due to “dog drool” he didn’t anticipate when placing the table next to the couch where his dog liked to rest!  He plans to try to improve the finish and seal it differently to protect it from the dog.

Dave Duesterhaus showed an etched Plexiglas sign in the shape of a circular saw blade that read “Pawpaw’s Workshop” on the top half of the blade and “Measure, Cut, Cuss, Repeat” on the bottom.  The Plexiglas also had a saw, hammer and chisel etched in it and was illuminated by color LED lights.  The center was mad of maple and had a hand plane outline in it.  His son made it for him as a Christmas gift.

Bill Guffey showed a few gifts he made this year.  He showed a bowl, and a salt & pepper set made from 150 year old white oak that fell on the family home place.  The bowl was made of crotch wood and he used coffee grounds to fill in small cracks. He also made a magnifying glass with a walnut handle.  All were finished with lacquer.

Jeremy Price showed several bowls he turned.  One was made from spalted maple sourced from his great grandparents’ home place located at the Twin Creeks marina area.  He harvested 13 bowl blanks from the downed tree.  The finish on this bowl was Odie’s Oil and Odie’s Wax.

Jeremy also showed a cherry bowl, a catalpa bowl/vase and a walnut bowl.  The walnut was provided by Darren Earle.

Richard Gulley showed a couple of caricatures that he started with in his original “wood shop” that consisted of 4 pocket knives!  He carved “Ma & Pa”.

Richard showed his Christmas gift to himself which was a Festool palm sander.  He noted the vibration was virtually non-existent compared to others he has used.  He said that comfort allowed him to sand for hours without hand fatigue!

He showed a drying rack/casserole dish holder he fashioned.  He wasn’t sure of the proper orientation, so decided to leave an engraved name off the rack/holder as it may be upside down depending on the use!

He also showed a “transitional” hand plane which is approximately the size of a #4 plane.  He made a new cherry body and handle and conditioned the metal and sharpened the blade.

Reilly Earle showed a 2’ by 2’ floor panel with a Celtic Knot inlay pattern of ambrosia maple and walnut.  He scroll sawed the knot pattern which resulted in the desired panel and its mirror-image from the waste wood!  The installation looked great!

Internet Links of Interest

Here’s a simple safety tip from Fine Woodworking in video format. Simple, but could be effective.

https://www.finewoodworking.com/2022/01/05/safety-speed-bumps 

 Carver’s Corner

The Splinter Carvers continue to meet first and third Saturdays of the month from 8:30 am to 10:30 am (whether Jim’s there or not).  The shop is located at 201 Jolliffe Acres Ln, Tullahoma. Tools and wood are available at the meetings, just bring yourself and try your hand at carving!

Sweeping Up

I found these Peanut cartoons on Pinterest. The quotes probably aren’t from Charles Schulz, but I think they’re relevant.

Watch out for SPLINTERS!

Submissions to the newsletter are more than welcomed. Send funnies, tips, or other content that may be of interest and you may see it in a future edition of SPLINTERS.

Newsletter Vol 36 / Issue 12

Greetings

I have ambivalent feelings about December. The close of one year and the beginning of another. We’re looking back and remembering both good and bad of the past year, all the while knowing we can’t tarry there long. There’s a new year just around the corner that holds both unknown trials and joys. Whether we like it or not, we have to live there.

All in all, though, December is probably my favorite month. It’s a month of hope and promise. “For unto us a child is born, unto us a son is given: and the government shall be upon his shoulder: and his name shall be called Wonderful, Counseller, The mighty God, The everlasting Father, The Prince of Peace.” Isaiah 9:6. For that promise, I am truly thankful.

Now let’s get started with Splinters!

November Meeting

Fred Heltsley did a great job with his presentation of creating a production run of a small harp including creating a kit for the project. Production of a project is a different animal and involves a lot of forethought and multiple iterations of jigs and construction methods.

December Meeting

We will have our next meeting on Tuesday, December 21st from 6:30-8:30.  The December Program will be “Super Show & Tell”. So, bring in projects past and present. Maybe early Christmas presents you bought for yourself! (I hope I’m not the only one that does that 😊)

I’m also going to put out a challenge for a “Santa Look Alike Contest” Be forewarned, I’ve been in training since July.

November Show & Tell

Here are the items that were shown in last month’s Zoom/Live meeting. See pictures in the online version.

Matt Brothers presented pictures of live edge walnut that he planed for a friend.  The walnut starting dimensions were 2” thick, 20” wide and 8’ long.  They turned out beautifully.  His friend is working with a table maker from the Stones River Woodworking Club to build his live edge table.

Matt also presented an island top he made from hickory.  It had a space for an undermount farm-style sink.  He finished top, bottom and sides with pre-catalyzed lacquer and paste wax to try to protect it from the moisture from activities around the sink.  He advised the client to periodically apply wax to protect the wood top.

Matt’s third project was a white oak door made for a house located on the University of the South grounds.  The house was built in 1910 so the door needed to match that style and finish.  Jack Kincella provided the finish to match the existing house trim.  The door looks beautiful and perfectly matches the home’s trim.

Jim Jolliffe showed two bark houses he bought from a friend, Steve Rogers, who carved them both from 175 year-old cottonwood bark.  Steve is an outstanding carver, who has moved back to the Chicago area from St Louis.  Steve has studied with Rick Jensen, the “father” of carving cottonwood bark houses.

Carl Blumenthal showed a large cedar live edge sign he sand blasted to hang over a driveway entrance.  He discussed the challenges of sand blasting walnut and cedar.  He noted that cedar is easier to blast.  He has to carefully watch the sand blasting penetration into the wood based on knots, heartwood, and sapwood density.  He uses a vinyl-type matte for his blasting design templates that are cut to cover all the wood that won’t be blasted.  He said the paint type and style varies with the piece’s design.  For exterior projects, Carl finishes with water-based Varathane Exterior Poly that is slightly thinned with mineral spirits.  Carl highlighted a safety note with sand blasting based on recent experience.  He had to create a “blasting room” for this large piece.  He wore full personal protective equipment (PPE) during the blasting.  After the piece was finished, he had removed his PPE and wanted to go back into the chamber to look at the piece.  The high-pressure air was still on and attached to the blasting wand.  The wand is actuated by a foot switch.  As Carl approached the piece, he accidentally stepped on the foot switch causing the blasting hose to fire and whip around the chamber!  The gun whipped past Carl’s eyes, blasting sand into his unprotected eyes.  He scratched his cornea and was still in discomfort during tonight’s meeting.  He’s thankful he is healing and knows it could have been even worse.  Lessons learned including wearing PPE whenever you are around tools and to turn off/depressurize high pressure air systems when finished.

Richard Gulley showed a deer sign he CNC-carved into a pine slab for Jack Kincella.  Jack will apply the finish to the piece.  Richard showed a “puzzle chair” or “pack chair” that is a child’s rocking chair that can be assembled and disassembled easily.  The pattern was provided by visiting woodworker Steve Tracy at a previous meeting. Richard made a model out of MDF and reduced the slot a bit from the MDF thickness to tighten the joints. 

Richard has been busy CNC-carving “a gazillion” Christmas ornaments. Twelve sets of “Names of Jesus” each with thirty separate names. They were made from a variety of woods and finished with lacquer. He also carved (CNC) 66 chip-carved Christmas Trees for friends.  Finally, he carved some “Merry Christmas Y’all” ornaments.

Mike Layfield showed tic-tac-toe boards he made from a variety of hardwoods including red oak, white oak and cherry.  He finished them with lacquer.

Internet Links of Interest

Just one –  https://www.finewoodworking.com/project-guides/shop-projects/mini-workbench-works-wonders

 Carver’s Corner

The Splinter Carvers continue to meet first and third Saturdays of the month from 8:30 am to 10:30 am (whether Jim’s there or not).  The shop is located at 201 Jolliffe Acres Ln, Tullahoma. Tools and wood are available at the meetings, just bring yourself and try your hand at carving!

Sweeping Up

More funnies from Pinterest this month. Here’s a few of them:

A refresher course in proper Southern English.

Merry Christmas to all you birds!

Watch out for SPLINTERS!

Submissions to the newsletter are more than welcomed. Send funnies, tips, or other content that may be of interest and you may see it in a future edition of SPLINTERS!

Newsletter Vol 36 / Issue 11

Greetings

I’m thankful for Thanksgiving. It’s a holiday you can sink your teeth into – figuratively and literally. Folk seem to be wanting to change the name of everything theses days, even doing away with things we love and hold dear – even Thanksgiving! If it were up to me to change the name of Thanksgiving, I’d change it to Thanksliving, and change its duration to 365 days. I consider myself and my family to be blessed of God and I want to live like it every day..

Now let’s get started with Splinters!

October Meeting

When it comes to Show & Tell, all our members are above average. Be sure to check the online newsletter for pictures.

Program – Geoff Roehm and assistant Christian Carroll are determined to bring music to the masses. The program “Building a Box Dulcimer” was a great step in accomplishing that goal.

 November Meeting

We will have our next meeting on Tuesday, November 16th from 6:30-8:30.  Fred Heltsley will present “Mass Production of the FCC-22 Harp Kit”. The program will cover the design and assembly of a low-cost but functional 3-octave harp.

A Tool/Craft Sale is scheduled for November 20th at the Decherd Nazarene Church gymnasium. Bring your surplus tools and any handmade items you wish to sell. We will set up on Friday the 19th afternoon – evening. Setup time will be discussed at the November meeting.

October Show & Tell

Here are the items that were shown in last month’s Zoom/Live meeting. See pictures in the online version.

Paul Jalbert presented the results of our support of Tim’s Ford Heritage Days Saturday and Sunday October 9th and 10th.  He noted that Chuck Taylor and Vince Zaccardi demonstrated turning tops and honey dippers, respectively. Jim Jolliffe allowed visitors to carve their own 2-3” tall cottonwood bark pumpkins and take them home.  Paul had a large sweet gum log with a rope pattern that allowed multiple carvers at a time with great results.  The log, when finished, will be donated to Tim’s Ford State Park.  Paul has an “artist’s log” of all who carve.  When a piece is complete, the “artist’s log” is attached to the carving as a record.  He noted that he has supported the Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts and Tim’s Ford with seven large carving activities over the past 10 years.  He counted up the artist’s signatures over the multiple efforts and was pleased to announced that he surpassed 1,000 carvers logging the respective “artist’s log” this past weekend!  Outstanding results, Paul!!! Here’s all the Heritage Days pics.

Jim Jolliffe showed a 16” gnome carved from basswood (Pic1, Pic2, Pic3) finished with a base coat of rattle-can lacquer, acrylic paint and finish coats of rattle-can lacquer.  The large hood, beard and robe (with hands in the robe’s pockets) eliminated the need to carve eyes, ears, a mouth and hands which made the carving pretty quick and easy!

Dennis Finney showed two beautiful pepper mills and multiple pens he turned .  All were finished with Mohawk sanding sealer and lacquer.

Mickey Knowles showed a variety of inlay and segmented salt shakers and pepper mills.  He described the inlay process and some lessons learned.  The description included raw stock that he used to inlay the turning blanks.  All but one of the shakers/mills were finished sanding sealer and lacquer. The other was finished with MinWax Polyurethane which was very easy to apply and worked well.   Mickey also showed a large mimosa bowl he turned and finished with teak oil.

Matt Brothers and Pete Cokenmueller showed a birdseye maple blanket chest they had built together.  This was the third chest they had built.  Matt previously made a walnut chest for his daughter and Pete made a cherry one for his oldest daughter.  This chest was for Pete’s younger daughter.  The chest had dovetail joinery on the drawers and chest which were made with a Leigh Dovetail Jig versus the hand-cut dovetails on the previous two.  The drawers and blanket compartment were all cedar lined.  The top was plywood with 1” solid birdseye maple banding and birdseye maple veneer based on lessons learned from the walnut chest top that warped as it aged.  Helical head joiners and planers were used with no tear-out of the birdseye maple.  They finished the chest with nitrocellulose lacquer.

Steve Tracy showed a two-foot, or slightly larger, coniferous tree made from pallet wood.  Steve rips the boughs to 2-1/2” and then “steps” the boughs every 2-1/2” beginning from 5” long to 7.5”, 10” and so on.  He says they sell great and can be used for Christmas and any other holiday.  The largest tree he’s made is 10 feet tall!  No finish is applied as each buyer has their own finish opportunities and decorating schemes.  He noted one client attached mug hooks to her tall tree that is on her front porch year-round.  She decorates it for multiple holidays including Thanksgiving, Christmas and St Patrick’s Day!

Internet Links of Interest

*Fine Woodworking has a simple tip for aligning pins, tails, and drawer bottom groove in hand cut dovetails.

*From Woodcraft magazine – A free PDF article on maintaining your router. I think maintenance is too often overlooked in our shop.

Carver’s Corner

The Splinter Carvers continue to meet first and third Saturdays of the month from 8:30 am to 10:30 am (whether Jim’s there or not).  The shop is located at 201 Jolliffe Acres Ln, Tullahoma. Tools and wood are available at the meetings, just bring yourself and try you

r hand at carving!

Jim Jolliffe joined the Leiper’s Fork Carvers at Franklin TN on Saturday Oct 30th to carve pumpkins for a real estate company to raffle and give away.  Kay Huey, Vic Hood, Tim Wright and Jim carved 12 or so pumpkins.  Pic1, Pic2, Pic3, Pic4, Pic5

Sweeping Up

I found several funnies from Pinterest this month. I’ll share a few of them:

Watch out for SPLINTERS!

Submissions to the newsletter are more than welcomed. Send funnies, tips, or other content that may be of interest and you may see it in a future edition of SPLINTERS.

Newsletter Information

Splinters is a publication of the Tennessee Valley Woodworkers. For submissions, email editor, Richard Gulley (rgulley@utsi.edu .)

Membership Information

If you change your phone number, email address, etc.; please notify Chuck Taylor, membership chairman (931-728-7086 or taylor_cw@charter.net). This will allow the membership listing on the web site to reflect current and up-to-date information of all our club members.

Newsletter Vol 36 / Issue 10

Greetings

I’m thankful that we’re entering into the holiday season. I love fall weather. You just don’t sweat as much. As far as the actual holidays, I’m not a big fan of Halloween. Except my wife always buys lots of candy and we have fewer Trick or Treaters every year.

BTW, picture of the 2021 picnic at Fall’s Mill have been published.

Now let’s get started with Splinters!

September Meeting

The show and tell was great. You can tell woodworkers are turning their focus to Christmas.

Program – Segmented Turning by Tom Farr.
Tom did a great job introducing folk to segmented turning. We have several talented segmented turners in the club, but I’m not one of them.

October Meeting

We will have our next meeting on Tuesday, October 19th from 6:30-8:30.  Our program will be “Building a Box Dulcimer” by Geoff Roehm.

The Tool Sale scheduled for October 23rd has been cancelled. As an alternative, we will discuss a mid-November tool sale/craft show.

September Show & Tell

Here are the items that were shown in last month’s Zoom/Live meeting. See pictures in the online version.

Bob Truesdale showed two beautiful bowls he turned.  One was made of walnut and the other was made of black gum wood.  He enjoyed turning both bowls due to their distinctive grain patterns.  Both were finished with lacquer.

 Eric Strotheide showed a circus wagon he made from oak.  He finished the wagon in Danish Oil.

 Clay Cooper and Carl Blumenthal showed a sandblasted sign out of walnut that had a map of Tim’s Ford and associated highways on it.  Carl said it was difficult to apply the templates for each layer of the design.  The sign was finished with spray on lacquer.

Judy Bennett showed an intarsia scene of a bride and groom for their oldest grandson who is getting married soon.  She used Aspen and Walnut for the intarsia.  The grandson’s sister is also getting a bride and groom intarsia piece for her wedding in 6 months.  She finished it with spray-on lacquer.

Judy also showed four intarsia welcome signs that had season themes for Spring, Summer, Fall and Winter.  She used a variety of scrap wood from their shop including cedar, purple heart, mahogany, ash and yellow heart.  They were also finished with spray on lacquer.

Gary Bennett showed turned Christmas ornaments turned from mahogany, walnut, box elder and poplar. He finished all with poly.

Gary also showed more than 20 porch balusters and a pair stair posts he turned for a porch.  He had sought support at a previous meeting and decided to turn them himself.  They look great!

Gary Runyon showed a slotted sliding lid box.  The lid was made from eucalyptus and the sides from cherry.  It was finished with walnut antique oil.  It was the first time Gary had worked with eucalyptus and he noted it is very hard wood.

 Darrell Albert showed an antique bowl and passed it around to the members to see if they could identify the wood.  Not sure anyone could successfully identify the wood. Darrell showed three chittum burl spoons that he finished with walnut oil.

 Richard Gulley showed a SawStop safety cartridge that fired into his blade recently.  He said it nicked his finger but didn’t draw blood.  He noted he’s had the saw for more than five years and had two finger-saving incidents!

 Internet Links of Interest

For a plethora of wood related videos check out Wood magazine’s YouTube channel:

https://www.youtube.com/user/Wood/videos 

Carver’s Corner

The Splinter Carvers continue to meet first and third Saturdays of the month from 8:30 am to 10:30 am (whether Jim’s there or not).  The shop is located at 201 Jolliffe Acres Ln, Tullahoma. Tools and wood are available at the meetings, just bring yourself and try your hand at carving!

Sweeping Up

I found several funnies from Pinterest this month. I’ll share a few of them:

Submissions to the newsletter are more than welcomed. Send funnies, tips, or other content that may be of interest and you may see it in a future edition of .

Newsletter Information

Splinters is a publication of the Tennessee Valley Woodworkers. For submissions, email editor, Richard Gulley (rgulley@utsi.edu .)

Newsletter Vol 36 / Issue 09

Greetings

For the “What I’m Thankful For” series, I’m going to re-plow some old ground. I think one of the first things I wrote about was good friends- especially those in the wood club. During the past several weeks I’ve come to realize how special it is to work with friends of like mind. Several came to my shop a few weeks ago and cut out parts for several bookcases for the Literacy Council. Vince was the job foreman and Paul Jalbert, Jim Joliffe, Mickey Knowles and myself made up the crew. The parts were taken to Henry Davis’ shop for assembly the next week. I was under the weather and stopped by just to see how they were doing. Henry Davis and Larry Wendland were in charge of quality control and Dennis Finney (good man) joined the crew above to assemble the bookcases. So, get together with a fellow club member and work on a project together. Working together turns acquaintances into friends and friends into friends for life.

Now let’s get started with Splinters!

August Meeting

We had a great time at the Annual August Auction. Over $1100 was raised for the club. The proceeds are used to lower the cost of seminars (and dues) as well as helping with community projects.

More info on dues coming at the September meeting.

September Meeting

We will have our next meeting on Tuesday, September 21st from 6:30-8:30.  Our program will be on segmented turning by Don Farr of Huntsville.

Our Fall picnic will be September 25th at Fall’s Mill. We will start setting up at 11:00 and eat lunch at 12:00. The club will provide BBQ and drinks and members should bring a favorite side or dessert for a fabulous potluck meal!!
Also, the mill and out buildings/displays (including the “new” schoolhouse) will be open for you to explore!
For directions and more information about Falls Mill, go to https://fallsmill.com

August Show & Tell

Here are the items that were shown in last month’s Zoom/Live meeting. See pictures in the online version.

Carl Blumenthal made a Man Cave stone sign out of sandstone quartzite for the evening’s auction.  This rock was personally quarried by him in Wisconsin and brought to TN. It is sandstone that transformed to quartzite. This rock is sand blasted with Aluminum Oxide sand. This graphic is unique to Carl and the first time he had ever had to do this, in which he had to blast the cave into the rock first which is all backwards from what he usually does. Usually, he blasts the words and stuff into the rock, not the surroundings. Then he had to paint the outside of the rock to give the cave look. After that he had to mask everything off except the TV, man, dish, table, and verbiage. Then he came back and blasted all that and painted it. This rock, after painted, gets washed to get all the remaining sand out of the rock.  Carl noted: To whomever acquires the rock: This rock can go outside or inside since he used a rock and concrete sealer to seal the pores to help prevent freezing water from splitting the rock or chipping out the paint.

Darren Earle showed a ~14” diameter box elder bowl that was initially turned by Tom Church in 2010.  Darren finished it in 2021 and was providing it for the auction.  The beautiful contrast of blond wood with red coloration was evident (again) after Darren turned it down recently. It is finished with paint sealer.

Jeremy Price showed a ~7” diameter cherry bowl that he turned early in his turning experience.  It was finished in Odie’s Oil and Odie’s Wax.

Chuck Taylor showed a maple and cherry music/jewelry box he made for the auction.  It has maple sides and bottom with a cherry lid and splines for the box sides. He finished it with lacquer.

Judy Bennett showed an intarsia flower she created early in her intarsia experience.  She used walnut, and maple for her project and finished it with spray-on poly.

Gary Bennett showed an oak bird house he made for the auction. He finished with poly.

Tom Gill showed turned carver’s mallet made from Black Locust and finished with wax.

Gary Runyon showed a turned, threaded acorn box made of a dogwood base and a cherry top. He also showed a turned, threaded needle box that had a wood-burned and painted flower design. His third piece was a cherry box with a slotted sliding lid.  All three were provided for the auction.

Darrell Albert made a chittum burl dish for the auction and finished it with walnut oil.

Clay Cooper brought a “Happy Campers” sign made of live edge walnut and sand blasted, painted, and sealed by Carl Blumenthal. Clay’s son takes it with him camping.

Jim Jolliffe showed a cottonwood bark Victorian Smiling Santa carving. He sprayed with 2 coats of rattle-can satin lacquer, added acrylic paint highlights and then sprayed it with two more coats of lacquer.

Internet Links of Interest

Wood magazine has a web page that recommends a wide variety of tools that are good quality yet affordable. 

Ever heard of a GRABO? I think I like it!! Check out these Izzy Swann YouTube videos –
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dNxj8_S4inQ

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sYwtIWYpPvQ&t=605s

Carver’s Corner

The Splinter Carvers continue to meet first and third Saturdays of the month from 8:30 am to 10:30 am (whether Jim’s there or not).  The shop is located at 201 Jolliffe Acres Ln, Tullahoma. Tools and wood are available at the meetings, just bring yourself and try your hand at carving!

Pete Miller sent this carving tip:
carving_tip

and this unique colored pencil “carving:

 

Sweeping Up

From Pinterest:

From Tom Gillard:

Watch out for Splinters.

Submissions to the newsletter are more than welcomed. Send funnies, tips, or other content that may be of interest and you may see it in a future edition of Splinters!