Category Archives: Newsletter

Newsletter Vol 36 / Issue 05

Greetings

This newsletter creeped up on me. First it was more than two weeks away and now it’s past due. If time flies when you’re having fun, I must be having a hilarious time.

My monthly “What I’m Thankful For” item is a no brainer – Friends. Some of my favorite friends are a direct result of belonging to Tennessee Valley Woodworkers. I’ve kept my sanity through a very strange year by working with good folk like Jack Kincella, Vince Zaccardi, Henry Davis, Dean Lutes, and many more. I’ll be glad when we can meet face to face again.

Now let’s get started with Splinters!

Great News From UTSI

Starting next month Tennessee Valley Woodworkers will be able to meet face to face in H111 again! It’s been a long time (over a year) but things may be getting back to normal. Thanks to Governor Lee and the folks at UTSI for opening these facilities and allowing us to meet again. I’m sure there will be more news during the Zoom meeting.

Zoom Meeting May 18

We will have our next Zoom Meeting on Tuesday, May 18th from 6:30-8:30.  The program will be three short videos evolving from last month’s meeting – videos on a simple work bench plan, how-to sharpen hand plane blades and How to Build a Krenov Style Block Plane.

Please join us by following the instructions below to:

  1. By Sunday, April 20th – Provide pictures and descriptions of your Show & Tell items to tnvalleywoodworkers@gmail.com 
    Descriptive information for each photo/related set of photos should include:

Woodworker Name: 
Project Name:
Wood(s)/Materials Used: 
Finishes applied:
Lessons Learned (if any): 

 April Show & Tell

Here are the items that were shown in last month’s Zoom meeting.

Pete Miller showed pens he’s turned from acrylics and finished with one step acrylic friction polish.  Pete noted during his lessons learned that turning acrylics is different than wood, especially if wood has been placed in the acrylic. The wood seemed not to be completely adhered to the acrylic material and he had a blowout even though he applied CA glue to try and stop blowout. He learned about blowout when drilling the blank even though he used a bit designed for acrylic.  The blowout occurred when the bit went through the acrylic. Pete changed to a brad point bit and had no blow out.  He also noted when you are turning a pen and start to take the acrylic down to the bushing size GO SLOW because when you start to round the blank on the ends to meet the bushing size it could grab and cause the blank to chip. Lastly, Pete learned keep your tools really sharp as it makes a difference and once the blank is rounded you start to get nice acrylic ribbons coming off the blank. During the Q&A, fellow turners supported the use of very sharp carbide turning tools for acrylics.

Loyd Ackerman showed a TV Credenza, 66”L x 18”D x 22”H made of Oak Plywood and solid Oak.  He applied Min-Wax Golden Oak Stain and Satin Lacquer for the finish.  Loyd recommended for finishing that a period of several days between staining and applying lacquer to allow the stain solvent to evaporate. Loyd shared a lesson learned when using rare earth magnets for latches.  Don’t forget to confer with a Club member for advice when matching magnets on the door and the carcass frame “catch”.  The Tip from Advisor/Wood Club Member Chuck Taylor: Be sure to watch magnet polarity, so the magnets hold the door instead of repelling the door.  Critical information to know before gluing the magnets in the door and the carcass frame!

Richard Gulley and Vince Zaccardi collaborated on a pair of oak Mission Style Tables for use on the recently remodeled UTSI Auditorium Stage.  Loyd Ackerman assisted with the table plans.  The stain used was Mohawk Honey recommended by Jack Kincella.   Jack applied a glaze to cover some worm holes/tracks and sprayed with a satin finish. The Mohawk Honey is an oil-based stain and works very well.  It has a reducer if the user wants to lighten the stain.  Mohawk has a tremendous shade variety and, while costly, it is very easy to apply.  Table construction was basically mortise and tenon done on a pantorouter. The project was started long ago (about the time we did the auditorium hand rails.) But there were delays then COVID and, well, that says it all. Richard planned to deliver the first of next week.

Internet Links of Interest

Pete Miller sent me this – Interesting CA glue product. Never saw it before and thought the club might be interested. 

https://fb.watch/531XFIz9Hi/

Several links from Kreg’s Build Something website.

One more link. How would you like to have a dart board where you never miss? Take a look at this – you’ll be amazed! (Or maybe I have a low threshold of amazement.)

https://www.markroberbuildinstructions.com/auto-bullseye

TVW YouTube Channel

Sorry I haven’t followed through on the video posting. I thought the problem was not enough hours in the day. I’ve had to revise that theory. I think it’s a case of not having the endurance to take advantage of the hours available.

 Here’s the link to our channel –

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCCBMvw434qQ5ND7wjeWat3w/

Carver’s Corner

The Splinter Carvers continue to meet first and third Saturdays of the month from 8:30 am to 10:30 am (whether Jim’s there or not).  The shop is located at 201 Jolliffe Acres Ln, Tullahoma. Tools and wood are available at the meetings, just bring yourself and try your hand at carving!

 Sweeping Up

This from Jim Jolliffe:

“You might be a woodcarver if you strop your knives while you wait for the blood to stop flowing.”

I found these two on Pinterest –

That’s all for this month. Watch out for SPLINTERS!

Submissions to the newsletter are more than welcomed. Send funnies, tips, or other content that may be of interest and you may see it in a future edition of SPLINTERS.

Newsletter Vol 36 / Issue 04

Greetings

If you read the local newspapers, you all probably know I’ve been a little more than occupied. I’m filing city politics under “This too shall pass.” I’m also practicing being silent. I can already be silent in seven different languages!

As to my “What I’m Thankful For” resolution, I’m thankful for all I learned in VBS and Sunday School when I was a child – God is Great, God is Good (All the time!)

Now let’s get started with Splinters!

Zoom Meeting April 20

We will have our next Zoom Meeting on Tuesday, April 20th from 6:30-8:30.  The program will be on hand cut dovetails.

Please join us by following the instructions below to:

  1. By Sunday, April 20th – Provide pictures and descriptions of your Show & Tell items to tnvalleywoodworkers@gmail.com 
    Descriptive information for each photo/related set of photos should include:

Woodworker Name: 
Project Name:
Wood(s)/Materials Used: 
Finishes applied:
Lessons Learned (if any): 

March Show & Tell

Here are the items that were shown in last month’s Zoom meeting.

Karen Browning showed various maple and cherry turnings she completed at Doyle McConnell’s shop.  The turnings were finished with lacquer. (Pic1, Pic2, Pic3)

Denis Urbanczik presented four projects he recently completed.  The first was a compost bin storage container made of Eastern Cedar and finished in teak oil.  The second was a hard pine sofa frame refinishing project. Finish was not yet applied.  Denis noted the effort took a lot of paint stripper to remove the original finish. That takes us to the next small piece he made/invented — scraped finish collecting tool. PS: Hats off to all the restorers out there, this was a lot of work! Denis used a piece of pallet oak and old ballast casing.  He finished the oak piece with teak oil. It performed well!  The fourth and final piece was an upgrade to his router table fence.  He replaced the melamine fence with quarter sawn oak and finished it with mineral oil.

Loyd Ackerman Oak Box with CNC V-Carved Name “Wendell” in Top.  The box is 8.5” l x 5.25” w x 4.25” h and constructed of short thin Red Oak (maybe) wood pieces provided by Wendell.  The finish is rattle can lacquer.  His lesson learned is to smile when someone gives you inferior wood

Internet Links of Interest

I only have one link for you this month, but it’s AMAZING!

https://archive.org/

You can search the history of over 555 billion web pages on the Internet. You know, those web sites that used to be there but aren’t anymore. Even better, there’s books (I saw a lot of genealogy stuff), music (I listened to some Grateful Dead – there’s whole concerts). There’s just too much too even tell you about. WARNING! This site may connect you to a black hole – it may be hard to return to the real time/space continuum.

TVW YouTube Channel

Sorry I haven’t followed through on the video posting. I seem to be running out of day before I run out of “To Do’s”.

 Here’s the link to our channel –

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCCBMvw434qQ5ND7wjeWat3w/

 Carver’s Corner

The Splinter Carvers continue to meet first and third Saturdays of the month from 8:30 am to 10:30 am (whether Jim’s there or not).  The shop is located at 201 Jolliffe Acres Ln, Tullahoma. Tools and wood are available at the meetings, just bring yourself and try your hand at carving!

 Sweeping Up

I’ve found that no matter where I stand in the kitchen, that’s where my wife needs to be. With that in mind, I submit this bit of wisdom –

Submissions to the newsletter are more than welcomed. Send funnies, tips, or other content that may be of interest and you may see it in a future edition of SPLINTERS.

Newsletter Vol 36 / Issue 03

Greetings

We’re a little closer to getting back to a “normal” meeting. Remember “Normal”? Anyhow, this month will be a Zoom meeting, but it will originate from H111 at UTSI.

As to my “What I’m Thankful For” resolution, I’m thankful for SPRING! Our daffodils are in their “glory” stage. Day lilies and hostas are not far behind. I know lawn mowing and garden chores are coming too, but, in it’s own way, that’s a blessing too.

Now let’s get started with Splinters!

 Zoom Meeting March 16

We will have our next Zoom Meeting on Tuesday, March 16th from 6:30-8:30.  The program will be on combining epoxy and wood to create a stunning tabletop.

Please join us by following the instructions below to:

  1. By Sunday, February 14th – Provide pictures and descriptions of your Show & Tell items to tnvalleywoodworkers@gmail.com 
    Descriptive information for each photo/related set of photos should include:

Woodworker Name: 
Project Name:
Wood(s)/Materials Used: 
Finishes applied:
Lessons Learned (if any): 

  1. If you don’t have Zoom installed, you need to download and install the application to your computer before meeting time. Go to https://zoom.us/download#client_4meeting and download/install the Zoom Client for Meetings.
  2. On Tuesday, March 16th, join the Zoom meeting any time after 6 PM. Use the following link or the link sent to you by email.https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89242855320?pwd=VDJtL1RRWFZmaXBmQ3JJSHRxNWFRQT09

Looking forward to our next Zoom Meeting!

 February Show & Tell

Here are the items that were shown in last month’s Zoom meeting.

Chuck Taylor showed a Cherry Memory Box from “thinking” to “finished” stage.  He discussed the construction including the vanishing joint on the drawer front.  He noted the drawer linings were adhesive backed felt.  The Memory Box was finished with satin lacquer.  He said this was the 12th or 13th memory box he has made in his shop.

Loyd Ackerman showed five projects, four of which were from materials already resident in his shop.  The first was one of four Maple Recipe Boxes for his grandchildren to store recipes from their Grandmother.  The first recipe box is completed but hasn’t had finish applied yet.  Ultimately all will be lacquer.  His second project was left over glass candles: two 5” candles and one 3” candle.  He got this inspiration from wondering what to do with unused glass candles and scrap wood.  He used some un-used segmented rings and a chunk of walnut sapwood.  He saves segmented rings that aren’t used in vessels. That’s how he had rings for these projects. They all have a lacquer finish.

His third project was 3 Make-Up Brushes turned and assembled for his granddaughter finished in lacquer.  Loyd’s fourth project was Maple Bowl #410 made from Red Maple.  The bowl is 5 ½” Diameter x 2” high and finished with lacquer and wax.

Loyd’s fifth project was a Shelf Unit for Cast Iron Cookware. Loyd’s son is a chef who collects cast iron cookware and needed a sturdy storage unit for it.  He made the Shelf Unit from three, 2” x 10” x 10’ boards.  The shelves were cut and milled to 1 ¼” thickness. The uprights had dado joints cut ¼” deep to hold shelves.  He used 2 ½” Screws to hold shelves in and primed the entire unit with Kilz.  His lesson learned was that he should have primed the parts before assembly because the painting would have been much easier!

Jim Jolliffe showed a Bench Top dust collector he made for light power carving and woodburning in his shop.  He’s always wanted one and rushed to build it in advance of shoulder surgery that would limit his normal carving activities.  The dust collector is built around an old, small squirrel cage fan motor that was 12”w x 12”d x 17”h.  The enclosure is 22”w x 19”d x 13”h.  The width and height accepts a 12” x 20” x 1” air filter.  The depth of the enclosure houses both the motor and a short, 6” deep air intake.  The base was made from 3/4” plywood  and the sides were made from 3/8” plywood.  The top has a rectangular opening to accommodate the motor exhaust vent.  A 4” circular x 90 degree elbow is connected to the exhaust to vent it toward the rear of the enclosure and also draw ambient air in the direction of the intake Three 12” deep clear Plexiglas walls were cut to fit the top and the sides of the air intake.   This allows the work piece to be placed in the enclosure to maximize dust/fumes collection.  The Plexiglas walls are affixed to the enclosure by adhesive Velcro strips.  This allows them to be stored flat in the intake opening for transport/storage.  Additional Velcro strips are placed on the top and sides closest to the user so the top can be adjusted up or down to decrease/increase air intake.  Jim wired the motor and an accessory “zip strip” to two switches to control the operation.  A lesson learned is that the zip strip already had an on/off switch so an additional switch was unnecessary for it.  He had the motor, wire and wood for the project so only had to buy the Plexiglas, Velcro, Air Filter and Zip Strip.  No finish was applied at the time of the Show and Tell as the device was completed the night before surgery.

Internet Links of Interest

*Take a look at these shop tips from Wood magazine.

*Inspired by last month’s program, I came across this link from Woodcraft on how to build a 3-in-1 shooting board. (Also, note the risers the author is using during the construction – very interesting.) The article can be downloaded as a PDF.

TVW YouTube Channel

This month’s program video of Jack Kincella and Tom Gillard doing the epoxy pour will be posted to YouTube after the monthly meeting. Here’s the link to our channel –

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCCBMvw434qQ5ND7wjeWat3w/

Carver’s Corner

The Splinter Carvers continue to meet first and third Saturdays of the month from 8:30 am to 10:30 am (whether Jim’s there or not).  The shop is located at 201 Jolliffe Acres Ln, Tullahoma. Tools and wood are available at the meetings, just bring yourself and try your hand at carving!

 Sweeping Up

For you outdoors folk —

(Note: I have a relative who has like a $100K camper. He spent a small fortune, but lives like a king! 😊

Submissions to the newsletter are more than welcomed. Send funnies, tips, or other content that may be of interest and you may see it in a future edition of SPLINTERS.

Newsletter Vol 36 / Issue 02

Greetings

I think last month’s Zoom meeting was a success. Several of you joined in and it was good to see those that attended. Some commented that they liked the Zoom format. They didn’t have to get out and travel on a cold, dark night. Some were able to show large pieces they had made for their home. It would have been very difficult to bring those items to an “in person” meeting. I agree that there are good points to the Zoom format, and I certainly agree Zoom is better than no meeting. But I long for the day when we can meet face to face.

That reminds of my New Year’s resolution – I want to focus on something I’m thankful for each month of 2021. Last month it was for a Heavenly Father who watches over His children. This month it’s for family and friends. I count you all as friends and we’re also family – the Tennessee Valley Woodworkers family!

Now let’s get started with Splinters!

 Zoom Meeting February 16

We will have our next Zoom Meeting on Tuesday, February 16th from 6:30-8:30.  The program will be on the use of a shooting board. If you’re not familiar with the term you really need to attend. Please join us by following the instructions below to:

  1. By Sunday, February 14th – Provide pictures and descriptions of your Show & Tell items to tnvalleywoodworkers@gmail.com 
    Descriptive information for each photo/related set of photos should include:

Woodworker Name: 
Project Name:
Wood(s)/Materials Used: 
Finishes applied:
Lessons Learned (if any): 

  1. If you don’t have Zoom installed, you need to download and install the application to your computer before meeting time. Go to https://zoom.us/download#client_4meeting and download/install the Zoom Client for Meetings.
  2. On Tuesday, February 16th, join the Zoom meeting any time after 6 PM. Use the following link or the link sent to you by email.
    https://us02web.zoom.us/j/87608476929?pwd=YUZpbjNhQS9wU0dBZC9vRTZYYWZBQT09 

Looking forward to our next Zoom Meeting!

January Show & Tell

We’re changing the Show & Tell section back to pre COVID days. That is, the Show & Tell section will consist of what was shown in the previous months consist of items shown at the previous meeting. The following items were things shown at the January Zoom meeting, but not in the January SPLINTERS.

Gary Runyon has been working on many projects since our last meeting!  He discussed his progress on hand cut dovetail joinery and showed pictures of pine and cherry dovetails from the first one to a later one.  As a result of his practice, he is getting consistently good ones now.  Gary showed us finger jointed boxes with sliding lids made of cherry, black walnut and white oak and finished in Minwax Antique Oil Finish.  The finger joints were cut on a three-axis router.  Gary showed three threaded acorn boxes with dogwood bottoms and cherry tops and finished with Briwax.  He also showed a Tanto style tool/storage box made of ambrosia maple and finished with Minwax Antique Oil Finish.  He showed a CD storage box also out of ambrosia maple made with finger joints and finished with Minwax Antique Oil Finish. His final project was 18th Century style tape looms made from cherry and finished with Minwax Antique Oil Finish.

Allen Odell shared four Christmas elves he carved out of basswood for his grandkids.  He finished them in colored pencils and spray lacquer.  Judy Bennett noted that she uses oil paint pencils for finishes similar to Allen’s pencils and will share her pencil source with the club.   Allen noted that the project was fun in Jim’s shop but his wife said to keep carving!

Fred Heltsey shared some of the gifts he has made for his kids, their spouses, and grandkids.  First was a red cedar mug turned from a 4×4 air dried post.  He added CA glue to seal some cracks and finished it with 3 coats of wipe-on spar varnish and micro crystalline wax.  He learned that CA glue dries before you can coat large areas in one sitting; so apply thin coat in single passes with small pieces of paper towel; repeat using a fresh towel piece for each pass; and DO NOT overlap passes!  Fred showed turned candle sticks made from 100-year-old Douglas Fir 3”x14” floor joists for 1.5” pillar candles.  He finished them with 3 coats wipe-on CA glue and noted, like the mug, CA glue dries before you can coat large areas in one sitting.  Fred showed three turned Christmas ornaments.  One had a spalted maple ball and sycamore finials; one with a royal paulownia ball and black walnut finials; and one with a Wisteria ball and apple wood finials.  All were finished with 3 thin coats of wipe-on CA glue.  Again, you need be aware that CA glue dries fast so you need to limit the amount of surface area you finish at a time. Fred turned a button lidded box with a black walnut lid and a box bottom made from a 100-year-old yellow pine 2×12 floor joist.  The lid insert was made from sycamore.  The lid and insert were finished with walnut oil and the base was finished with spar varnish and Johnson Wax.  The lesson learned on this turning is to drill the lid holes before hollowing as he didn’t on this one and had to add the lid insert to cover backside tear-out.  Fred also turned a long-handled scoop and a pair of short-handled scoops from windfall red cedar.  He finished them with multiple coats of walnut oil and noted that the scoop walls were thicker than he intended. Fred showed 33 shadow-copied stair baluster finials turned from a 100-year-old red oak 2×4 stud and finished with Brush-On Minwax Satin Penetrating Stain, then 3 thin coats of brush on spar varnish.  He noted the shadow-copy method is fast and accurate and that, even though it took 4 lathe setups, he could turn a square blank to a finished finial in 6 minutes!  Fred showed “String Steadies” made from 3/4” plywood, screws and cotton string.  No finish was applied.  They work very well to safely hold thin finials and are easy to set up. Fred offered to demonstrate the shadow-copy method as a future program.

Patrick Murphy showed a 10” high decorative optical illusion created for his physics students from black walnut and cherry.  He finished the piece with Clear Satin spray varnish.   He got the idea from a YouTube video.  The “floating” component is suspended by small chains.  John Hartin noted that the sum of the moments connecting the “floating piece” to the “mounted piece” need to be equal to zero for this “illusion” to work. Fred Heltsey noted that chairs have been made with rope instead of chains but the chains work better for the “illusion” because they don’t stretch like rope.

Jim Jolliffe showed a Victorian Moon Santa and Star carved out of basswood and finished with boiled linseed oil, acrylic paint, Deft Semi-Gloss spray lacquer, and liquid wax.  The carving design was based on a 2D painting.  He noted that he hadn’t held a carving piece in his hand for a while.  To use both hands for carving, it was a challenging effort to clamp the Moon shape to carve details.  He used a carving arm and vice-grip type clamps to secure work for some final details like the holly, cap texture and beard texture.

When we asked if anyone else had something to show, Clay and Cindi Cooper used their tablet computer to show a live edge table, sideboard (which can convert to a bar) and mirror in their home.  The pieces were beautifully constructed by Clay with woodburning accents by Cindi. We noted that these pieces were able to be seen via Zoom and they wouldn’t be hauled into an “in person” meeting. (no pictures available.)

Internet Links of Interest

*This link was sent by Pete Miller. You can send a Valentine’s Day greeting to one of the kids at St. Jude’s Hospital. Thanks for the link Pete!

https://www.stjude.org/get-involved/other-ways/valentines-day.html

* This link about sharpening saw blades is from Wood magazine. https://www.woodmagazine.com/tool-reviews/tablesaws/regain-your-edge?did=600377-20210121&utm_campaign=wood-online_newsletter&utm_source=woodmagazine.com&utm_medium=email&utm_content=012121&cid=600377&mid=49250283056

A Sharpening service in TN –

Byler Saw Shop
1661 Cedar Creek Road
Vanleer, TN  37181
615-763-6227

Website – https://www.bylerindustrialtool.com/

TVW YouTube Channel

No new video this month, but there will be more to come. As an alternative, here’s a video from Stumpy Nubs about 10 cheap cool tools

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Fz8JfhD0h0  

Carver’s Corner

The Splinter Carvers continue to meet first and third Saturdays of the month from 8:30 am to 10:30 am (whether Jim’s there or not).  The shop is located at 201 Jolliffe Acres Ln, Tullahoma. Tools and wood are available at the meetings, just bring yourself and try your hand at carving!

 Sweeping Up

Pete Miller sent me this one —

That’s all for this month. Watch out for SPLINTERS!

Submissions to the newsletter are more than welcomed. Send funnies, tips, or other content that may be of interest and you may see it in a future edition of SPLINTERS.

 

Newsletter Vol 36 / Issue 01

Greetings

December has been a trying month for the Gulley family. I tested positive for COVID-19 a couple days before Christmas. Later my daughter and grandson also succumbed. Christmas was postponed and everyone was in quarantine. We’re finally having Christmas tonight (Jan 12th.) But the good news is, everyone survived! Even better good new, 2020 is behind us. And while 2021 isn’t off to a roaring start, it’s a new year and holds the promise of what we make it. So find yourself a plan and head toward the shop.

But first, let’s get started with Splinters!

Zoom Meeting January 19

We will have our first Zoom Meeting and Super Show and Tell on Tuesday, January 19th from 6:30-8:30.  Please join us by following the instructions below to:

  1. By Sunday, January 17th – Provide pictures and descriptions of your “Super Show & Tell” items by Sunday, January 17th to tnvalleywoodworkers@gmail.com or jajollife@aol.com. Descriptive information for each photo/related set of photos should include:

Woodworker Name: 
Project Name:
Wood(s)/Materials Used: 
Finishes applied:
Lessons Learned (if any): 

  1. To join this meeting, you need to download and install the Zoom application to your computer before meeting time. Go to https://zoom.us/download#client_4meeting and download/install the Zoom Client for Meetings.
  2. On Tuesday, January 19th, join the Zoom meeting any time after 6 PM. Use the following link or the link sent to you by email.

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89203501872?pwd=ZFI3S1dqajRnTEhiWnE3aVpXc2VTUT09

  Once there, simply click on the link below “Join Zoom Meeting” to join the meeting.  The Zoom app will ask if you want to “Open zoom.us”.  Click on the “Open zoom.us” button and a window will open with your camera showing you only and a highlighted button to “Join with Video”.  Select this option to “enter” the meeting room.  Once you’re in, you see In the lower left corner of the window a microphone icon with a red line (UnMute) over it and video camera with a red line (Start Video) over it.  If you click on each icon, the sound and video will come on for you.  In the upper right hand corner, you will see a set of 9 squares in a 3×3 pattern.  Click and hold on it and it will give you the option of a “gallery” or “speaker” view.  I recommend “gallery” view.  No special passwords or meeting information is required!

Looking forward to our first Zoom Meeting!

January Show & Tell

Several folks have sent me pictures of what they’ve been working on during the pandemic. The pictures can be seen on the website Gallery and links are in the online newsletter.

Walt Elliott – Walt says “As a new member and a new woodworker, I am amazed at the talent of so many members!

My woodturning background consisted of turning 2 bowls–one with the help of a friend from Athens TN a few years ago and one with the help of Doyle McConnell after moving to Manchester — both done on their lathes. It was so enjoyable, I started looking for a used Powermatic lathe and when the pandemic hit, took the plunge and bought a new one in May 2020. Since then, I’ve turned about 30 bowls: learning mainly from trial and error and YouTube videos.

I’m definitely still on a big learning curve but am really enjoying it. And looking forward to when the club can resume meetings.

Although not done within the last month, attached are a few examples–all done since last May. The bowls range from just over 3″ diameter to just under 17″ diameter and from just over 1″ deep to almost 7″ deep.” (Pic1Pic2Pic3Pic4)

Richard Gulley – Last month I showed pictures of an unfinished CNC carving the I made for Jack Kincella’s church. My wife liked it so much, I made her one for a Christmas present. Jack was kind enough to finish it for me and he did a great job, as usual.

Loyd Ackerman – Loyd says “The need for an organizer in my den drove me to this design.  It has 10 drawers for storing the odds and ends in an organized manner.  I’ve included a map/index to tell what’s in each drawer.  The drawing from Sketchup is beside the picture I took in the shop.  The other shot is in my closet storage area. ”

 Loyd also sent a picture of Christmas presents sitting on the dining room table ready to be wrapped.  He says the open bowl [left front] decided to stay on his display shelf.  Some things just call out to you.

Ross Roepke – Ross has been a member of the club for many years and has been as prolific as any hobby woodworker I have known. Ross sent me just a small sample of projects he has made over the past 25 years and given to friends, family, and charities. (Pic1Pic2Pic3Pic4Pic5Pic6Pic7Pic8Pic9Pic10Pic11Pic12Pic13, , Pic15Pic16Pic17Pic18Pic19Pic20Pic21Pic22Pic23Pic24Pic25Pic26Pic27Pic28Pic29Pic30Pic31)

Vince Zaccardi – Vince was commissioned to make several crosses (the number kept increasing.) Vince and I enjoyed working on the crosses together. They’re made of cherry. The text is CNCed and the joinery is mortise and tenon cut on the pantorouter.

Safety in the Shop

I recently had a close call in the shop. Here’s what happened: I was jointing several pieces and had on a long sleeve shirt. (Any red flags yet?) Faster than a blink, my red shirt started flying out of the jointer and I jerked back as hard as I could. After it was over, my right sleeve was about 9” shorter than the left. I’m thankful for a sharp helix head that cut rather than winding me up. I’m thankful for a VERY old red long sleeve shirt that ripped instead of winding me up. But mostly, I’m thankful for a heavenly Father that watches over young children and idiots. I’m 68 so that excludes me from the first group.

 Internet Links of Interest

This link from Pete Miller – A couple beginners turning videos from Craft Supply.

Working with natural edge slabs – This Wood magazine web article give some tips for working with slabs.

TVW YouTube Channel

This month’s video was inspired by a 2012 seminar where club members met and constructed a Longworth chuck. In this video, Loyd Ackerman expands on the process.

Carver’s Corner

The Splinter Carvers continue to meet first and third Saturdays of the month from 8:30 am to 10:30 am (whether Jim’s there or not).  The shop is located at 201 Jolliffe Acres Ln, Tullahoma. Tools and wood are available at the meetings, just bring yourself and try your hand at carving!

New Klingspor Representative

Jack Kincella has been working closely with our new Klingspor representative, Jeff Ridenour. To see this month’s specials use this link:
https://www.woodworkingshop.com/html/midJanuary.html

Sweeping Up

How about a couple New Year Resolutions —

That’s all for this month. Watch out for SPLINTERS!

Submissions to the newsletter are more than welcomed. Send funnies, tips, or other content that may be of interest and you may see it in a future edition of SPLINTERS.

 

Newsletter Vol 35 / Issue 12

Splinters December 2020

Volume 35 / Issue 12

Greetings

I trust all you elves and Santa’s helpers have been busy in the workshop. I’ve already received several Show & Tell pics that confirms that you have been. I saw Mickey Knowles the other day and he says he has a table full of projects but hasn’t sent them in. I suspect there may be a lot of folk like that too.

Let’s get started with Splinters!

News Regarding Our Club’s Future

Several folk on the Executive Committee will be having a Zoom meeting Tuesday evening to try out the interface. The plan is to hold a club meeting in January via Zoom.

December Show & Tell

Several folks have sent me pictures of what they’ve been working on during the pandemic. The pictures can be seen on the website Gallery and links are in the online newsletter.

Peter Hunter -created another nice CNC project. Peter says “This is a 16″ x 1″ tray I made from carbonated bamboo, which I just discovered is a grass, not a wood. My son-in-law just started a little craft brewery, and asked me to make him something to commemorate it. It is finished with Watco Butcher Block oil.

Chuck Taylor – definitely has some elf blood in his veins. This month he’s cranking out cutting boards made from maple, cherry and holly glue-up. Size is 10” wide X 15” long and 1” thick. The finish is Mahoney’s food-safe oil finish. I believe he said he was making about 15.

Gary Walker – sent me pictures of a really nice hutch he made for my family doctor (his wife 😊.) I believe he told me he did the stained-glass work too.

Richard Gulley – Last year I made ornaments with names of Jesus carved into them (cnc.) This year my wife realized we didn’t have a set! So, I made 8 more sets. I painted the text black and sprayed with semi gloss rattle can. Total of about 250 pieces.

I also finally fulfilled a promise to Jack Kincella and carved a “Jesus in the Garden of Gethsemane” for his church. Carving time was 2 hours roughing, 9 hours finish cut, plus 2 hours cleanup and sanding.  Jack will do the finishing.

Jack Kincella – sent me this pic of a table we just completed. I helped with the joinery on the base. Jack did the assembly and finishing. The top has a story of its own. A lady commissioned Dean Lutes to construct a large live edge table and gave him the dimensions. When she saw the top, she didn’t think it was long enough. Dean made her a bigger top and this one languished in his shop for a long time. Jack seems to have a gift for hooking up one man’s excess with another man’s need. Now Jack’s friends, Ron and Fran have the table they’ve been wanting for a long time.

Jim Jolliffe – has been busy as well.

(Picture)
– Two cottonwood bark houses finished with satin lacquer
– Two cottonwood bark Santa’s finished with satin lawyer, acrylic paint and matte spray.
– One cottonwood bark elf and holly finished with satin lawyer, acrylic paint and matte spray.
– One basswood Santa finished with acrylic paint and then dipped in boiled linseed oil.

Seven Nativities were made from persimmon wood. The nativity scene and star were scroll sawn from the “thin” (3/8”) blank and the “thick” (5/8”) back blank was used as the base.  The star was chip carved to provide depth. Each set of three pieces will be finished by the client and then glued together to be used as a mantle or shelf mount in the client’s extended family households.

Jim’s last project is a carved pumpkin that missed the November newsletter.  I showed the picture to a lot of folk but somehow omitted it from the November newsletter.

Judy Bennett – sent me several pictures of her intarsia work. I love these. She makes great use of the wood’s color, grain and thickness to create very realistic scenes. (Pic1, Pic2, Pic3, Pic4, Pic5)

 Loyd Ackerman – says “I didn’t get a lot done in the shop this month.  I was able to finish the clock I started last month.  The piece uses a 3” movement with old fashioned face which appeals to me for some reason.  My original idea was to use a glaze over the lacquer finish but when the finish was done – a coat of sanding sealer plus 3 coats of satin lacquer – the color was sufficient so I didn’t glaze it. 

The face of the clock box is carved with a ring around the clock just using wingding fonts inside two rings.  The 3d carving at the bottom of the face board and in the crown are just clip-art from Vectric’s gallery.  All, of course, done on the CNC machine. 

The cherry applied half columns on the front of the side members are a split turning.  The finials, also cherry, are just a simple turning.

The back of the clock case is plywood.  Two brads embedded at the top of the insert hold the back in and the decorative brass machine screw at the bottom is threaded into the bottom member of the clock case.”

Tom Gillard – Tom relates another hike in the woods –

On the second weekend of November, Paul and I, along with 3 other friends, went on another backpacking adventure, this time to the South Cumberland Recreation Area in Beersheba Spring.  The weather was forecast to be wonderful for the majority of the weekend.   We had two main goals for this weekend:  1: have a good time with friends in the outdoors and 2: Take a side hike in search of the virgin forest that many years ago we had heard existed within the park. These trees are around 400 years old according to the Park service.  

We hiked into the area on a Friday and spent the night amongst the owls, coyotes and the possibility of a bear in the area.  We didn’t see or hear the bear. 

On Saturday morning we packed our day bags and set off up an unmarked and off trail portion of the park.  Once we left the trace of an old logging road the going got VERY rough.  We were walking on a boulder field which was covered with leaves, moss and ferns.  Needless to say, we had to really watch our step or we would go up to our knee between rocks.  We finally got into the area where the trees were located.  In our head we were expecting something like the Redwood forest, but these trees were spread out.  There wasn’t a lot of undergrowth, so the canopy must be pretty dense.  The trees listed in the chart below were the largest ones we saw. 

We didn’t start measuring the height until later, but they were significant. We ate lunch on the edge of the creek that flows through the area before dropping under the rock bed and disappearing.  We spent about 7 hours hiking into the gorge and back to camp that day. 

We spent Saturday night listening to the coyotes again.  On Sunday we got packed up to leave just as the light rain started to fall.  Three hours later as we got to the top of the Great Stone Door the rain stopped.  We changed into dry clothes for the ride back to town.

It was a great weekend and we did get to see some large trees.

Some of the trees we saw:
 Red Oak  13 ft circum  49.7″ dia
Poplar     11’5″ circum  43.6 ” dia
Hemlock  11’2″ circum  42.7″ dia
Shagbark Hickory  8’0.5″ circum  30.7″ dia  9 Toms tall
Poplar  9’7″ circum  36.6″ dia    16 Pauls tall
Poplar  11’7″  circum  44.2″ dia  12 Toms tall

Conversion factors for tree height-
1 Tom = 6.0 ft    1 Paul = 0.9165 Tom

Internet Links of Interest

Several sent me some interesting links:

Larry Bowers – Sent me an email with several pictures of how some folk stack their firewood. They have too much free time on their hands!

Pete Miller – sent me an email regarding the Washington monument. This is not the exact article he sent me, but very similar. We need to be mindful that the constitution does not speak regarding separation of church and state. Rather, it intended to protect our religious liberty from the government. (Not the government from the church.) That aside, the history of the construction of the Washington monument is interesting and worth the read.

I saw an article on organizing your shop at Wood magazine.

TVW YouTube Channel

I have another sad story about this month’s video. Loyd Ackerman was kind enough to deliver a video to me so I could post it this month. I copied it to my computer and gave him back his usb drive. Now I can’t find the file – sigh. I’ll get it straightened out and posted.

Carver’s Corner

The Splinter Carvers continue to meet first and third Saturdays of the month from 8:30 am to 10:30 am (whether Jim’s there or not).  The shop is located at 201 Jolliffe Acres Ln, Tullahoma. Tools and wood are available at the meetings, just bring yourself and try your hand at carving!

Sweeping Up

This month I have one for the men –

And one for the ladies –

That’s all for this month. Watch out for SPLINTERS!

Submissions to the newsletter are more than welcomed. Send funnies, tips, or other content that may be of interest and you may see it in a future edition of SPLINTERS.

Newsletter Vol 35 / Issue 11

Splinters November 2020

Volume 35 / Issue 11

Greetings

In our Sweeping Up section, I’ve used lots of jokes about getting older. Since there are so many seniors in our group, I guess I’m picking low hanging fruit. But really, “old” is relative. I was talking to a lady in our church a couple weeks back. She’s 93 now and was telling me about how great it was when she was 65 and pushed mowed her own lawn. She still calls me one of the “young folk.”

When my father-in-law turned 80 he came over to the house and and told us of a sad discovery he had made – he was old. He didn’t know when he got old, but when he looked in the mirror that morning there was no denying it – he was old. He still felt young, but that guy in the mirror was old. I think he went down faster after that.

I still lead singing at church occasionally and sometimes we sing “Never Grow Old.” As I look out over the folk singing it’s easy to see that the words don’t mean much to the 30 and younger crowd. The 40s and 50s don’t really get it either. But as I watch the 60 and up crowd, there’s definitely a connection with “In a land where we’ll never grow old.”

I really don’t know what got me thinking along this line. Maybe because my back’s acting up a lot and arthritis has set up camp in both hands. But I guess there’s not much you can do to change the inevitable. You either get old or die young. So, if you’re getting into the Golden years and you still feel pretty good, I’d suggest you avoid mirrors. After all, what you don’t know won’t hurt you.

Let’s get started with Splinters!

From our Treasurer

The November Wood Club monthly meeting is when we normally start collecting membership dues for the coming year. This is one of the perks of being treasurer because I get to socialize with each of the Wood Club members for at least a few minutes.  I will confess to reviewing the photos on the membership roster before this meeting to better match a name and a face. Unfortunately, our next Wood Club meeting is likely still months away. You may recall that we decided earlier this year to apply any dues paid in 2020 to 2021 as well. So please do not worry about being delinquent. We will start collecting dues at our next Wood Club meeting.

News Regarding Our Club’s Future

The Executive Committee will be meeting soon (virtually or in person) to discuss when, where, and how the club can start meeting again. Currently we are looking at January to try and meet via Zoom (online) or maybe a limited number of attendees determined by the meeting location. Or maybe a combination of the two methods. Stay tuned for further announcements.

November Show & Tell

Several folks have sent me pictures of what they’ve been working on while “Sheltered in Place.” I never cease to be amazed at the quality of work our folk turn out. The pictures can be seen on the website Gallery and links are in the online newsletter.

Loyd Ackerman – Loyd send in 3 projects:

Work in progress:  The base material is maple and the trim is cherry.  The trim is a split spindle to dress the uprights, the finials, and the insert.  The finish will be lacquer with glazing to achieve the antique look. 

Segmented Vessel: I knew there was a reason for most of my segmented vessels being a closed form design.  An open mouth design like this means you have to finish both inside and out.  Outside is easy.  Inside, not so easy.

A walnut tray with compound angles to tilt the sides.  14 X 10 X 2

Chuck Taylor – finished 35 Tangram puzzle games for children’s gifts. Ambrosia maple with satin lacquer finish and 2 small magnets installed to hold top lid in place.

Richard Gulley – presented a plaque to his new pastor for pastor appreciation day.

Vince Zacardi and Richard Gulley – have been assisting the Winchester American Legion Post 44 with their Cross and Flag Memorial project. We helped make the crosses that are on display now in the Winchester area. So far we’ve made a few less than 200, but hope to have 500 by next Memorial Day. Post 44 also sent the club a nice certificate for the work we’ve done.

Jack Kincella – doesn’t have a Show & Tell, just a Tell. Jack has convinced the Hoover Paint Store to give TVW members a 10% discount. They have 8 locations in the middle Tennessee area.

Paul Jalbert sent me a report of some of the things he’s been up to during Covid. He says, “I have processed one new member in and memorialized two deceased members out with Wood Club contributions. Also, I was asked by Horse Play in September to participate with them in a Channel 6 (Tullahoma) coverage of the recent improvements to the Horse Play facility. I promoted the Wood Club because that was the mechanism by which all of my bench and sign work there was made feasible. I have worked on several projects with other Wood Club members when asked to help.”

He’s currently working with his son to restore a 1915 Crescent 12-in jointer that he found on Craig’s list.

 

Internet Links of Interest

8 Ways to Make End-to-End Joints – From Wood magazine.

You’ll find more interesting links and tips at the end of this article.

TVW YouTube Channel

In a video from 2009, Doyle McConnell demonstrates how he created his “Fibonacci” sculpture. Starting with a closed vessel made with layers of Baltic birch plywood, he cuts the bowl into thin, curved cross sections. Those sections are then shifted and glued back together to create a unique form.

https://youtu.be/vCMtxBL5vkI

Carver’s Corner

The Splinter Carvers continue to meet first and third Saturdays of the month from 8:30 am to 10:30 am (whether Jim’s there or not).  The shop is located at 201 Jolliffe Acres Ln, Tullahoma. Tools and wood are available at the meetings, just bring yourself and try your hand at carving!

Sweeping Up

Thanks to Tom Gillard for this first one. The second was found on Pinterest. Watch out for Splinters!

   

That’s all for this month. Watch out for Splinters!

Submissions to the newsletter are more than welcomed. Send funnies, tips, or other content that may be of interest and you may see it in a future edition of Splinters!

Newsletter Information

Splinters is a publication of the Tennessee Valley Woodworkers. For submissions, email editor, Richard Gulley (rgulley@utsi.edu .)

Membership Information

If you change your phone number, email address, etc.; please notify Chuck Taylor, membership chairman (931-728-7086 or taylor_cw@charter.net. This will allow the membership listing on the web site to reflect current and up-to-date information of all our club members.

Newsletter Vol 35 / Issue 10

Splinters October 2020

Volume 35 / Issue 10

Greetings

The “norm” for the monthly Greeting is usually light hearted. However, in keeping with the “norm” for 2020 (there is no norm,) I’d like to go in a different direction.

I’d like to ponder on how quickly the abnormal can become normal, and what we can do to prevent that from happening.

We haven’t had a club meeting in about 8 months. During that same time, folk have been quarantined in their homes, prevented from going to work/church (but not Walmart.) We been advised to wear masks and stay 3’, then 6’, now as much as 12’ apart. I’m not going to speak on whether any of that (other than church attendance) is right or wrong. A lot of that depends on who you are and where you are. But I would like to offer some suggestions for abating the isolation that is being foisted on us.

Take whatever opportunity you might have to work together in small groups. Jack Kincella and I have worked together on a couple projects. I know that Vince Zacardi, Paul Jalbert, Henry Davis, Jim Jolliffe, Dean Lutes, Matt Brothers, Bill Ward and probably many others have worked together in different combinations on several different projects. The carvers are meeting twice a month at Jim’s shop. So, reach out to your fellow woodworkers. If you know of any that are still quarantined, send them an email or give them a call.

When you get out into the public, be kind to people. Cashiers, waiters, and waitresses are having an especially hard time as tempers grow short. Use the powerful words “Thank you” a lot and smile (or draw a smile on your mask 😊.) 

Coming Events

  • One fine day– we’ll have a Tennessee Valley Woodworkers Club meeting. The program will include a Super “I Survived Covid19/Riots/Supreme Court Appt/Election” Show & Tell! We will meet again. Don’t lose hope.
  • Summer/Fall Events – Cancelled

From our Treasurer

Due to the cancellation of so many Wood Club meetings and activities in 2020, the Wood Club Executive Committee has decided that dues paid for the year 2020 will also cover the year 2021. New members are still welcome to join ($10 individual and $15 family). Also, there is no rush to pay dues. This can wait until the next monthly Wood Club meeting.

October Show & Tell

Several folks have sent me pictures of what they’ve been working on while “Sheltered in Place.” I never cease to be amazed at the quality of work our folk turn out. 

Chuck Taylorfinished 2 sets of “handmade” ABC blocks, 48 blocks and 96 letter/numbers in each set. Blocks are Bradford pear and have light coat of sanding sealer. Boxes are maple and finished with satin lacquer.

Clay Cooper – submitted pictures of a Poplar Slab and the buffet it turned into.  

David Duesterhaus – made a bookcase from a Woodsmith plan using cherry plywood and cherry wood and finished with tung oil.
Thanks to Vince Zaccardi and Paul Jalbert for getting him the last few pieces of cherry when he ran a few pieces short.

Jack Kincella – Jack and Richard Gulley built a large white oak dining table (9.5’ long X 45” wide) with a live edge (some real, some simulated.) The wood came from Dean Lutes and most of the sub-assembly was done at Dean’s shop. Assembly was done at Jack’s shop and, of course, Jack did the finishing. The customer was very pleased with the finished product.

Jim Jolliffe – “Scottish Bark House with Tree and Thistle” – Planned for the “Piping On The Green” celebration held annually at The Celtic Cup Coffee House the first weekend in April.  Sprayed with 2 coats of satin lacquer and highlight painted with acrylic wash.  Final spray with matte lacquer. ( Pic 1, 2, 3, 4)

Loyd Ackerman – The end table project for my granddaughter is a mix of woods that I had on-hand.  The top, shelf, and aprons are of mahogany but the legs are a mix.  Having only enough walnut for two, the other two were made from poplar and stained with aniline dye to match the color of the walnut legs.  The legs were carved on the CNC with a vine model.
– The next project is a beanbag toss game for my grandchildren.  It’s assembled from dimensioned lumber from Lowes and has several coats of sealer and paint.  All holes were filled with wood putty sealed with shellac and sanded.  Three coat of water base enamel finish.
– My step-son had low coffee table and asked me if I could make longer legs for it.  Just a rough work table so this is how it turned out.
– Continuing my Huntsville Country Club logo theme evolved into a set of coasters for my son who is their chef.  The project required carving part of the job and then removing the workpiece painting steps and returning it to the CNC to finish the carving.  The trick was re-aligning it perfectly between mountings.

Noel Johnson – Noel says “It has been a while since I’ve been able to attend meetings and then COVID, but I’m still turning! Here are a couple from last week; lidded butternut and a piece of Osage Orange from the wood pile. Best wishes to all.”

Richard Gulley – I carved a cross, using the CNC, into a crematory urn box for the husband of one of our members, Teri Smith. I counted it an honor

Sam Clark – Sam says “I ordered some pen kits last week and I thought I would try something new.   My 1st serria pen using Olive wood burl. I’ve been been saving this wood for years.  Time to use it…I’m not getting any younger. 😃

Pete Miller – Here are 4 cutting boards in the shape of Tennessee. The wood is Ambrosia Maple and the finish is mineral oil.
The wood was on sale at Woodcraft and the temptation was to great so I got 1 6’board that was 6” wide and 1/2 board that was about 10” wide. They had a cheese cutter in the shape of TN so I traced it for my pattern. I think they look pretty good.

Peter Hunter – Peter sent in a couple picture of a Thanksgiving tray he carved on his CNC. I like it!

Tony Murphy – A pair of Craftsman-style sideboards made from white oak and poplar, finished with stains and Tried and True varnish. Dovetails are hand-cut, joints are drawbored.

An Unusual Tree

Tom Gillard sent me this info. See the pictures in the online newsletter.
During the days of October 2 – 6, Paul Jalbert, Mike Glennon, John Petty, and myself were backpacking in The Big South Fork National Recreation Area in Northern Middle TN. (near Jamestown).  On this trip we were hiking in a dense second growth forest of many varieties of trees.  The one that stood out was the Bigleaf Magnolia (M. macrophylla).  We saw many small examples but were amazed at the size of a few others.  Many of the larger examples sprouted from a single root system with many trunks.  They were 9” in diameter and about 15-20’ tall.  This is within the cover of the deep forest amongst the large Oak trees without much sunlight, so this is pretty good. The leaves of these trees are huge.  When the leaves fall in the Fall the white undersides make the ground look like a major catastrophe has occurred at their base. 

Internet Links of Interest

Pete Miller sent me this link to a glossary of woodworking terms.  https://www.popularwoodworking.com/techniques/woodworking-glossary/

Several wax recipes can be found at the top of this lumberjock thread – https://www.lumberjocks.com/alba/blog/18172#comment-781470

5 Need to Know Nailer Tips
https://www.woodmagazine.com/woodworking-tools/power/pneumatic-nailing?did=570727-20201015&utm_campaign=wood-online_newsletter&utm_source=woodmagazine.com&utm_medium=email&utm_content=101520&cid=570727&mid=42773514534

TVW YouTube Channel

Well, I redid my computer desk setup and now I can’t find my backups of the TVW video files. As soon as I locate them, I’ll post a new old video.

Carver’s Corner

The Splinter Carvers continue to meet first and third Saturdays of the month from 8:30 am to 10:30 am (whether Jim’s there or not).  The shop is located at 201 Jolliffe Acres Ln, Tullahoma. Tools and wood are available at the meetings, just bring yourself and try your hand at carving!

Jim reports that he and Steve Shores visited the Leiper’s Fork Carving Club during an outdoor and socially distanced sale of Ol Don Burgdorf’s carving books, videos, hand carving, power carving and wood stock over the past several weeks.

Sweeping Up

This month I have a couple signs for you –

Newsletter Information

Splinters is a publication of the Tennessee Valley Woodworkers. For submissions, email editor, Richard Gulley (rgulley@utsi.edu .)

Membership Information

If you change your phone number, email address, etc.; please notify Chuck Taylor, membership chairman (931-728-7086 or taylor_cw@charter.net. This will allow the membership listing on the web site to reflect current and up-to-date information of all our club members.

Newsletter Vol 35 / Issue 09

Splinters September 2020

Volume 35 / Issue 09

Greetings

This may be as late as I’ve ever started on a newsletter. The third Tuesday came quick this month, but I won’t use that for an excuse. More of a case of “Can’t Want To”. We’ll blame it on Covid19. Lately everybody else seems to be whipping that horse.

Coming Events

  • One fine day– we’ll have a Tennessee Valley Woodworkers Club meeting. The program will include a Super “I Survived Covid19/and Riots” Show & Tell! We will meet again. Don’t lose hope.
  • Summer/Fall Events – will be rescheduled in the fall.

Noteworthy

It is with sadness that we inform you of the death of Bob Leonard, one of our long-time TVW members.
Bob will be missed by all who had the opportunity to know him.

From our Treasurer

Due to the cancellation of so many Wood Club meetings and activities in 2020, the Wood Club Executive Committee has decided that dues paid for the year 2020 will also cover the year 2021. New members are still welcome to join ($10 individual and $15 family). Also, there is no rush to pay dues. This can wait until the next monthly Wood Club meeting.

September Show & Tell

Several folks have sent me pictures of what they’ve been working on while “Sheltered in Place.” The pictures can be seen on the website Gallery and links are in the online newsletter.

Gary Runyon – a few projects I’ve finished lately:

-Threaded Acorn boxes in Cherry and dogwood (pic1, pic2)
CD Storage boxes for the shop, ambrosia maple, finger jointed
-Tape looms and accessories for weaving tape in cherry

Gary BennettSalt & pepper grinders: Cherry using tung oil.
Kitchen bowl/basket: Walnut, maple open segments, using Deft spray lacquer. 
Steady rest: Oak, scrap plywood, bolts and inline skate wheels, brushed on polyurethane.

Logan Hickerson – Recently finished a wine bottle coaster of cherry wood with beeswax finish. There is a cork liner. The carved images are of scarlet oak leaves.

Loyd Ackerman – The end table (24 X 16 X 20) is a work in progress. The top, a shelf [not shown in picture], and aprons are mahogany.
Two of the legs are walnut. The other two are poplar dyed with dark walnut aniline dye. I settled for poplar since I didn’t have enough walnut. I plan to use Watco dark walnut wiping varnish to continue the color match. After several days, when the Watco is dry, I’ll use lacquer satin for the final finish.
Logo of the Huntsville Country Club – 11 X 11 X 0.5
CNC carved through black lacquer.
Coasters with same logo 3/8″ X 3 1/2″ 4 copies
A second iteration of the coasters will be carved through the black lacquer layer – if my new program works

Sam Clark – some bird houses Sam’s been working on recently.   He dyed the tops to match the birds.
Also, I’ve been making some corn hole games for family and friends. (pic1, pic2)

Internet Links of Interest

How do you sign your projects? Here’s some ideas from Wood Magazine.

Pete Miller sent this link for 5 methods of transferring images onto wood.  Pretty easy.
https://youtu.be/xHOWUR8vTvo

Here’s an interesting site for you woodturners –
https://www.aswoodturns.com/

TVW YouTube Channel

In this month’s video, Loyd Ackerman demonstrates his method of bending thin laminations using a vacuum press.

Carver’s Corner

The carvers are meeting again. Jim says , weather permitting, they can support carving both inside and outside.  

The carvers continue to meet first and third Saturdays of the month from 8:30 am to 10:30 am.  The shop is located at 201 Jolliffe Acres Ln, Tullahoma. Tools and wood are available at the meetings, just bring yourself and try your hand at carving!

News from the Leiper’s Fork Carvers –

“Our good friend and Club member Don Burgdorf passed away last spring.  His wife Sandie asked if we could help sort and sell some of his woodcarving tools and accessories accumulated over a lifetime of teaching and woodcarving.  Of course we were happy to assist.  We travelled to their home in Hohenwald and returned with three pickup truck loads of items.

We will be selling this unique collection over 5 Saturdays, beginning Sep 19, outdoors (weather permitting), behind the Leatherwood Studio in Leipers Fork where the Club meets.  The sale schedule is as follows:

Sep 19 – Books and videos
Sep 25 – Hand tools and accessories
Oct 3 – Power tools and accessories
Oct 10 – Wood, roughouts and carvings
Oct 17 – Misc and leftover items”

The Splinters Carvers are planning a convoy to the sale. Contact Jim Jolliffe for more information.

Sweeping Up

 Thanks to Pete Miller for sending enough funnies for a couple months.

       

Newsletter Information

Splinters is a publication of the Tennessee Valley Woodworkers. For submissions, email editor, Richard Gulley (rgulley@utsi.edu .)

Membership Information

If you change your phone number, email address, etc.; please notify Chuck Taylor, membership chairman (931-728-7086 or taylor_cw@charter.net. This will allow the membership listing on the web site to reflect current and up-to-date information of all our club members.

Newsletter Vol 35 / Issue 08

Splinters August 2020

Volume 35 / Issue 08

Greetings

This newsletter will probably get to you a little late. Seems like there’s been more life to live than there’s been time to live it in – if that makes sense.

I saw my friend and fellow club member Zeke Davis a couple Sundays ago. He asked about the club. I reported we weren’t meeting but I was publishing the newsletter and posting videos. He said he didn’t use email of have internet. Did I mention that Zeke was one of my smarter friends? Anyhow, I got his address and told him I’d mail him a newsletter this month. If you know anyone else that might need a hard copy mailed to them, let me know.

Noteworthy

Mrs. Julia Vinson Roan, 79, passed away unexpectedly Saturday August 8, 2020 at the Unity Medical Center in Manchester. She was the wife of Collins Roan, former club member, who also passed a short time back.

 Coming Events

  • One fine day– we’ll have a Tennessee Valley Woodworkers Club meeting. The program will include a Super “I Survived Covid19/and Riots” Show & Tell! We will meet again. Don’t lose hope.
  • Summer/Fall Events – will be rescheduled in the fall.

TVW YouTube Channel

In this month’s video, Henry Davis is given a tour of Gary Runyon’s shop. Gary is our current vice-president and is an accomplished woodworker and metalworker.

https://youtu.be/XF19Vjm76bY

August Show & Tell

Jim Jolliffe carved a cottonwood bark house for donation to the Breaking Parkinson’s Golf Tournament and silent auction.  It was finished with Satin Deft spray. (Pic1, Pic2, Pic3)

Loyd Ackerman – sent in a picture of the completed Butler Tray from last month with hinges installed. Loyd says he’s not terribly pleased with the wood figure but that’s what he had. Finish is satin lacquer.

The table is for the couch. The bottom plate slides under the couch and the top then provides a place for your drinks and snacks cantilevered over the couch. Tabletop is 12 x 18 inches. Spacing between bottom plate and apron under the top plate is 23 ½”. The material is cherry. Top joint at the cantilever pivot is glued with epoxy. Finish will be satin lacquer. (Pic1, Pic2)

News from Falls Mill & Museum
John & Janie Lovett sent in this update.

“We are making very good progress on the one-room log schoolhouse we began in January. It is now under roof and John is constructing the front porch. We have most of the furnishings, including a circa 1885 pump organ donated last year and restored by Bryan Thornton of Short Mountain Music Works. The organ was missing the music stand, and we found the image in an old company catalog. John made a full-size drawing and contacted Tom McGill to see if he was interested in making the stand. Tom agreed and got in touch with Darren and Riley Earle (we need an up-to-date picture of Riley.) They supplied the walnut, and Riley traced the image and cut the stand with his scroll saw. Tom completed the project with a sliding shelf that allowed adjustment of the stand. I have attached a photo of the organ and closeup of the stand.”

Internet Links of Interest

Try these shop-tested tips from Wood Magazine for hassle-free tablesaw operation.

Carver’s Corner

The carvers are meeting again. Jim says , weather permitting, they can support carving both inside and outside.  

The carver’s continue to meet first and third Saturdays of the month from 8:30 am to 10:30 am.  The shop is located at 201 Jolliffe Acres Ln, Tullahoma. Tools and wood are available at the meetings, just bring yourself and try your hand at carving!

Sweeping Up

 Thanks to Pete Miller for sending enough funnies for a couple months.

That’s all for this month. Watch out for Splinters!

Submissions to the newsletter are more than welcomed. Send funnies, tips, or other content that may be of interest and you may see it in a future edition of .

Newsletter Information

Splinters is a publication of the Tennessee Valley Woodworkers. For submissions, email editor, Richard Gulley (rgulley@utsi.edu .)

Membership Information

If you change your phone number, email address, etc.; please notify Chuck Taylor, membership chairman (931-728-7086 or taylor_cw@charter.net. This will allow the membership listing on the web site to reflect current and up-to-date information of all our club members.