Category Archives: Newsletter

Newsletter Vol 37 / Issue 01

Greetings

I have high hopes that 2022 is going to be an improvement over 2021. Not that last year wasn’t an improvement over 2020. There does seem to be some change for the better. I saw a quote the other day to the effect “when I said ‘things couldn’t get much worse’, I didn’t mean that as a challenge.” So, I’m crossing my fingers, praying hard, and hoping for a good year. Let’s get started with SPLINTERS!

December 2021 Meeting

The Super Show & Tell was great! Considering the duress and distress that everybody is going through, it’s amazing that you still turn out such great work.

January 2022 Meeting

We will have our next meeting on Tuesday, January 18th from 6:30-8:30.  Don Farr will be showing his process for building a grandmother clock.

December 2021 Show & Tell

Here are the items that were shown in last month’s Zoom/Live meeting. I don’t know if you’ve noticed but the “timing” of the Show & Tell Pics has gotten off. When we weren’t meeting, the newsletter described the items for that month. Once we started meeting again, the newsletter described pictures of the items shown the previous month. For example, the Gallery named 2021-12Dec on the website contains the pictures from November. If I can find a way to correct that’s not too labor intensive, I’ll fix it. If not, …

 However, it you view the online newsletters, the links lead to the correct items. Now on to Show & Tell.

Jim Jolliffe showed a Santa ornament, star & moon Santa ornaments, a bark house ornament and a cottonwood bark wood spirit. The Santa ornaments are basswood finished with BLO, acrylic paint highlights and lacquer.  The bark ornament was finished with lacquer and acrylic paint highlights.  The wood spirit hair and beard were sprayed with lacquer.  The face remained natural.

Larry Wendland showed a spalted birch serving tray finished with wipe on poly.  He also showed several highly colored box elder turnings from wood he gathered in Wisconsin and finished with wipe on poly.

Chris Sautter showed one of 14 “tanto style” pencil boxes he made out of cherry for his grandkids.  He went to a local trophy shop to get laser etching applied to the lids.  The boxes hold 12 colored pencils and have a “secret” compartment that the kids enjoy!  The boxes are finished in Danish Oil. Chris also showed one of 12 cutting boards he made from cherry, walnut, and maple “cutoff” pieces. The boards were finished with Walrus Oil.

Mickey Knowles showed bowl he made from butternut with walnut and pine laminated strips that were both horizontal (aligned with the bowl edge) and vertical through one half of the bowl!  The inspiration was from a bowl he saw 7-8 years ago.  It turned out beautifully.  He finished the bowl with sanding sealer and lacquer.  Mickey showed “inverse turned” tulips that begin with 3.5” square by 13” long blocks.  He used maple and walnut for the flowers and colored them with artisan dyes. The stems were made from dogwood.  The flowers were finished with Minwax. Mickey also showed two different tops he made.  One has a ball bearing that spins for a LONG time!  His other top, without a ball bearing, still spins well. (Picture)

John Hartin brought something old, something new, something borrowed and something blue to show.  Something old was his paternal grandfather’s draw knife that was forged from a wagon box bolt to become the drawknife.  The village blacksmith forged the blade! You could see one end of the knife still had the threads from the wagon box bolt!

Something new was a wooden cross that symbolized the new life one can gain through Jesus Christ.

Something borrowed was a turned, lidded box from a North Carolina woodturner John met at the John C. Campbell Folk School.  The lid’s knob and box bottom was made of cherry. The lid was made of pear wood.  The lid had coffee grounds as dimensional treatment.

Something blue was a Scandinavian “blue spalted” maple spoon.

Paul Jalbert showed a pair of bi-planes he made from patterns in the Great All American Wooden Toy Book.  He made the two identical planes from cherry with acrylic paint highlights and finished in Danish Oil.  Because they are identical, he included unique tail numbers for each of them.

Henry Davis showed an antique cherry magazine rack he made in 1954 as a high school sophomore in wood shop!  The rack had survived well.  He was unsure of the finish applied some 67 years ago.

Darren Earle showed a beautiful, large turned and bleached maple bowl.  The source of the wood was a tree that had been dead, standing for 30 years!  The lesson he learned was that the depth of the bowl drives tool stability challenges.  The tool flexes when far away from the tool rest and can break under the turning stress!  The “win” was that the bowl turned out smooth and round.  He applied a shellac finish.

Gary Runyon showed a curly cherry “cricket table” with three triangular drop leaves.  The table would allow the user to carry the table to the cricket match and set up to enjoy tea or other beverages during the match.  He applied Minwax Antique Oil finished and thought that would work for this end table.  He noted there were spots on the top due to “dog drool” he didn’t anticipate when placing the table next to the couch where his dog liked to rest!  He plans to try to improve the finish and seal it differently to protect it from the dog.

Dave Duesterhaus showed an etched Plexiglas sign in the shape of a circular saw blade that read “Pawpaw’s Workshop” on the top half of the blade and “Measure, Cut, Cuss, Repeat” on the bottom.  The Plexiglas also had a saw, hammer and chisel etched in it and was illuminated by color LED lights.  The center was mad of maple and had a hand plane outline in it.  His son made it for him as a Christmas gift.

Bill Guffey showed a few gifts he made this year.  He showed a bowl, and a salt & pepper set made from 150 year old white oak that fell on the family home place.  The bowl was made of crotch wood and he used coffee grounds to fill in small cracks. He also made a magnifying glass with a walnut handle.  All were finished with lacquer.

Jeremy Price showed several bowls he turned.  One was made from spalted maple sourced from his great grandparents’ home place located at the Twin Creeks marina area.  He harvested 13 bowl blanks from the downed tree.  The finish on this bowl was Odie’s Oil and Odie’s Wax.

Jeremy also showed a cherry bowl, a catalpa bowl/vase and a walnut bowl.  The walnut was provided by Darren Earle.

Richard Gulley showed a couple of caricatures that he started with in his original “wood shop” that consisted of 4 pocket knives!  He carved “Ma & Pa”.

Richard showed his Christmas gift to himself which was a Festool palm sander.  He noted the vibration was virtually non-existent compared to others he has used.  He said that comfort allowed him to sand for hours without hand fatigue!

He showed a drying rack/casserole dish holder he fashioned.  He wasn’t sure of the proper orientation, so decided to leave an engraved name off the rack/holder as it may be upside down depending on the use!

He also showed a “transitional” hand plane which is approximately the size of a #4 plane.  He made a new cherry body and handle and conditioned the metal and sharpened the blade.

Reilly Earle showed a 2’ by 2’ floor panel with a Celtic Knot inlay pattern of ambrosia maple and walnut.  He scroll sawed the knot pattern which resulted in the desired panel and its mirror-image from the waste wood!  The installation looked great!

Internet Links of Interest

Here’s a simple safety tip from Fine Woodworking in video format. Simple, but could be effective.

https://www.finewoodworking.com/2022/01/05/safety-speed-bumps 

 Carver’s Corner

The Splinter Carvers continue to meet first and third Saturdays of the month from 8:30 am to 10:30 am (whether Jim’s there or not).  The shop is located at 201 Jolliffe Acres Ln, Tullahoma. Tools and wood are available at the meetings, just bring yourself and try your hand at carving!

Sweeping Up

I found these Peanut cartoons on Pinterest. The quotes probably aren’t from Charles Schulz, but I think they’re relevant.

Watch out for SPLINTERS!

Submissions to the newsletter are more than welcomed. Send funnies, tips, or other content that may be of interest and you may see it in a future edition of SPLINTERS.

Newsletter Vol 36 / Issue 12

Greetings

I have ambivalent feelings about December. The close of one year and the beginning of another. We’re looking back and remembering both good and bad of the past year, all the while knowing we can’t tarry there long. There’s a new year just around the corner that holds both unknown trials and joys. Whether we like it or not, we have to live there.

All in all, though, December is probably my favorite month. It’s a month of hope and promise. “For unto us a child is born, unto us a son is given: and the government shall be upon his shoulder: and his name shall be called Wonderful, Counseller, The mighty God, The everlasting Father, The Prince of Peace.” Isaiah 9:6. For that promise, I am truly thankful.

Now let’s get started with Splinters!

November Meeting

Fred Heltsley did a great job with his presentation of creating a production run of a small harp including creating a kit for the project. Production of a project is a different animal and involves a lot of forethought and multiple iterations of jigs and construction methods.

December Meeting

We will have our next meeting on Tuesday, December 21st from 6:30-8:30.  The December Program will be “Super Show & Tell”. So, bring in projects past and present. Maybe early Christmas presents you bought for yourself! (I hope I’m not the only one that does that 😊)

I’m also going to put out a challenge for a “Santa Look Alike Contest” Be forewarned, I’ve been in training since July.

November Show & Tell

Here are the items that were shown in last month’s Zoom/Live meeting. See pictures in the online version.

Matt Brothers presented pictures of live edge walnut that he planed for a friend.  The walnut starting dimensions were 2” thick, 20” wide and 8’ long.  They turned out beautifully.  His friend is working with a table maker from the Stones River Woodworking Club to build his live edge table.

Matt also presented an island top he made from hickory.  It had a space for an undermount farm-style sink.  He finished top, bottom and sides with pre-catalyzed lacquer and paste wax to try to protect it from the moisture from activities around the sink.  He advised the client to periodically apply wax to protect the wood top.

Matt’s third project was a white oak door made for a house located on the University of the South grounds.  The house was built in 1910 so the door needed to match that style and finish.  Jack Kincella provided the finish to match the existing house trim.  The door looks beautiful and perfectly matches the home’s trim.

Jim Jolliffe showed two bark houses he bought from a friend, Steve Rogers, who carved them both from 175 year-old cottonwood bark.  Steve is an outstanding carver, who has moved back to the Chicago area from St Louis.  Steve has studied with Rick Jensen, the “father” of carving cottonwood bark houses.

Carl Blumenthal showed a large cedar live edge sign he sand blasted to hang over a driveway entrance.  He discussed the challenges of sand blasting walnut and cedar.  He noted that cedar is easier to blast.  He has to carefully watch the sand blasting penetration into the wood based on knots, heartwood, and sapwood density.  He uses a vinyl-type matte for his blasting design templates that are cut to cover all the wood that won’t be blasted.  He said the paint type and style varies with the piece’s design.  For exterior projects, Carl finishes with water-based Varathane Exterior Poly that is slightly thinned with mineral spirits.  Carl highlighted a safety note with sand blasting based on recent experience.  He had to create a “blasting room” for this large piece.  He wore full personal protective equipment (PPE) during the blasting.  After the piece was finished, he had removed his PPE and wanted to go back into the chamber to look at the piece.  The high-pressure air was still on and attached to the blasting wand.  The wand is actuated by a foot switch.  As Carl approached the piece, he accidentally stepped on the foot switch causing the blasting hose to fire and whip around the chamber!  The gun whipped past Carl’s eyes, blasting sand into his unprotected eyes.  He scratched his cornea and was still in discomfort during tonight’s meeting.  He’s thankful he is healing and knows it could have been even worse.  Lessons learned including wearing PPE whenever you are around tools and to turn off/depressurize high pressure air systems when finished.

Richard Gulley showed a deer sign he CNC-carved into a pine slab for Jack Kincella.  Jack will apply the finish to the piece.  Richard showed a “puzzle chair” or “pack chair” that is a child’s rocking chair that can be assembled and disassembled easily.  The pattern was provided by visiting woodworker Steve Tracy at a previous meeting. Richard made a model out of MDF and reduced the slot a bit from the MDF thickness to tighten the joints. 

Richard has been busy CNC-carving “a gazillion” Christmas ornaments. Twelve sets of “Names of Jesus” each with thirty separate names. They were made from a variety of woods and finished with lacquer. He also carved (CNC) 66 chip-carved Christmas Trees for friends.  Finally, he carved some “Merry Christmas Y’all” ornaments.

Mike Layfield showed tic-tac-toe boards he made from a variety of hardwoods including red oak, white oak and cherry.  He finished them with lacquer.

Internet Links of Interest

Just one –  https://www.finewoodworking.com/project-guides/shop-projects/mini-workbench-works-wonders

 Carver’s Corner

The Splinter Carvers continue to meet first and third Saturdays of the month from 8:30 am to 10:30 am (whether Jim’s there or not).  The shop is located at 201 Jolliffe Acres Ln, Tullahoma. Tools and wood are available at the meetings, just bring yourself and try your hand at carving!

Sweeping Up

More funnies from Pinterest this month. Here’s a few of them:

A refresher course in proper Southern English.

Merry Christmas to all you birds!

Watch out for SPLINTERS!

Submissions to the newsletter are more than welcomed. Send funnies, tips, or other content that may be of interest and you may see it in a future edition of SPLINTERS!

Newsletter Vol 36 / Issue 11

Greetings

I’m thankful for Thanksgiving. It’s a holiday you can sink your teeth into – figuratively and literally. Folk seem to be wanting to change the name of everything theses days, even doing away with things we love and hold dear – even Thanksgiving! If it were up to me to change the name of Thanksgiving, I’d change it to Thanksliving, and change its duration to 365 days. I consider myself and my family to be blessed of God and I want to live like it every day..

Now let’s get started with Splinters!

October Meeting

When it comes to Show & Tell, all our members are above average. Be sure to check the online newsletter for pictures.

Program – Geoff Roehm and assistant Christian Carroll are determined to bring music to the masses. The program “Building a Box Dulcimer” was a great step in accomplishing that goal.

 November Meeting

We will have our next meeting on Tuesday, November 16th from 6:30-8:30.  Fred Heltsley will present “Mass Production of the FCC-22 Harp Kit”. The program will cover the design and assembly of a low-cost but functional 3-octave harp.

A Tool/Craft Sale is scheduled for November 20th at the Decherd Nazarene Church gymnasium. Bring your surplus tools and any handmade items you wish to sell. We will set up on Friday the 19th afternoon – evening. Setup time will be discussed at the November meeting.

October Show & Tell

Here are the items that were shown in last month’s Zoom/Live meeting. See pictures in the online version.

Paul Jalbert presented the results of our support of Tim’s Ford Heritage Days Saturday and Sunday October 9th and 10th.  He noted that Chuck Taylor and Vince Zaccardi demonstrated turning tops and honey dippers, respectively. Jim Jolliffe allowed visitors to carve their own 2-3” tall cottonwood bark pumpkins and take them home.  Paul had a large sweet gum log with a rope pattern that allowed multiple carvers at a time with great results.  The log, when finished, will be donated to Tim’s Ford State Park.  Paul has an “artist’s log” of all who carve.  When a piece is complete, the “artist’s log” is attached to the carving as a record.  He noted that he has supported the Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts and Tim’s Ford with seven large carving activities over the past 10 years.  He counted up the artist’s signatures over the multiple efforts and was pleased to announced that he surpassed 1,000 carvers logging the respective “artist’s log” this past weekend!  Outstanding results, Paul!!! Here’s all the Heritage Days pics.

Jim Jolliffe showed a 16” gnome carved from basswood (Pic1, Pic2, Pic3) finished with a base coat of rattle-can lacquer, acrylic paint and finish coats of rattle-can lacquer.  The large hood, beard and robe (with hands in the robe’s pockets) eliminated the need to carve eyes, ears, a mouth and hands which made the carving pretty quick and easy!

Dennis Finney showed two beautiful pepper mills and multiple pens he turned .  All were finished with Mohawk sanding sealer and lacquer.

Mickey Knowles showed a variety of inlay and segmented salt shakers and pepper mills.  He described the inlay process and some lessons learned.  The description included raw stock that he used to inlay the turning blanks.  All but one of the shakers/mills were finished sanding sealer and lacquer. The other was finished with MinWax Polyurethane which was very easy to apply and worked well.   Mickey also showed a large mimosa bowl he turned and finished with teak oil.

Matt Brothers and Pete Cokenmueller showed a birdseye maple blanket chest they had built together.  This was the third chest they had built.  Matt previously made a walnut chest for his daughter and Pete made a cherry one for his oldest daughter.  This chest was for Pete’s younger daughter.  The chest had dovetail joinery on the drawers and chest which were made with a Leigh Dovetail Jig versus the hand-cut dovetails on the previous two.  The drawers and blanket compartment were all cedar lined.  The top was plywood with 1” solid birdseye maple banding and birdseye maple veneer based on lessons learned from the walnut chest top that warped as it aged.  Helical head joiners and planers were used with no tear-out of the birdseye maple.  They finished the chest with nitrocellulose lacquer.

Steve Tracy showed a two-foot, or slightly larger, coniferous tree made from pallet wood.  Steve rips the boughs to 2-1/2” and then “steps” the boughs every 2-1/2” beginning from 5” long to 7.5”, 10” and so on.  He says they sell great and can be used for Christmas and any other holiday.  The largest tree he’s made is 10 feet tall!  No finish is applied as each buyer has their own finish opportunities and decorating schemes.  He noted one client attached mug hooks to her tall tree that is on her front porch year-round.  She decorates it for multiple holidays including Thanksgiving, Christmas and St Patrick’s Day!

Internet Links of Interest

*Fine Woodworking has a simple tip for aligning pins, tails, and drawer bottom groove in hand cut dovetails.

*From Woodcraft magazine – A free PDF article on maintaining your router. I think maintenance is too often overlooked in our shop.

Carver’s Corner

The Splinter Carvers continue to meet first and third Saturdays of the month from 8:30 am to 10:30 am (whether Jim’s there or not).  The shop is located at 201 Jolliffe Acres Ln, Tullahoma. Tools and wood are available at the meetings, just bring yourself and try you

r hand at carving!

Jim Jolliffe joined the Leiper’s Fork Carvers at Franklin TN on Saturday Oct 30th to carve pumpkins for a real estate company to raffle and give away.  Kay Huey, Vic Hood, Tim Wright and Jim carved 12 or so pumpkins.  Pic1, Pic2, Pic3, Pic4, Pic5

Sweeping Up

I found several funnies from Pinterest this month. I’ll share a few of them:

Watch out for SPLINTERS!

Submissions to the newsletter are more than welcomed. Send funnies, tips, or other content that may be of interest and you may see it in a future edition of SPLINTERS.

Newsletter Information

Splinters is a publication of the Tennessee Valley Woodworkers. For submissions, email editor, Richard Gulley (rgulley@utsi.edu .)

Membership Information

If you change your phone number, email address, etc.; please notify Chuck Taylor, membership chairman (931-728-7086 or taylor_cw@charter.net). This will allow the membership listing on the web site to reflect current and up-to-date information of all our club members.

Newsletter Vol 36 / Issue 10

Greetings

I’m thankful that we’re entering into the holiday season. I love fall weather. You just don’t sweat as much. As far as the actual holidays, I’m not a big fan of Halloween. Except my wife always buys lots of candy and we have fewer Trick or Treaters every year.

BTW, picture of the 2021 picnic at Fall’s Mill have been published.

Now let’s get started with Splinters!

September Meeting

The show and tell was great. You can tell woodworkers are turning their focus to Christmas.

Program – Segmented Turning by Tom Farr.
Tom did a great job introducing folk to segmented turning. We have several talented segmented turners in the club, but I’m not one of them.

October Meeting

We will have our next meeting on Tuesday, October 19th from 6:30-8:30.  Our program will be “Building a Box Dulcimer” by Geoff Roehm.

The Tool Sale scheduled for October 23rd has been cancelled. As an alternative, we will discuss a mid-November tool sale/craft show.

September Show & Tell

Here are the items that were shown in last month’s Zoom/Live meeting. See pictures in the online version.

Bob Truesdale showed two beautiful bowls he turned.  One was made of walnut and the other was made of black gum wood.  He enjoyed turning both bowls due to their distinctive grain patterns.  Both were finished with lacquer.

 Eric Strotheide showed a circus wagon he made from oak.  He finished the wagon in Danish Oil.

 Clay Cooper and Carl Blumenthal showed a sandblasted sign out of walnut that had a map of Tim’s Ford and associated highways on it.  Carl said it was difficult to apply the templates for each layer of the design.  The sign was finished with spray on lacquer.

Judy Bennett showed an intarsia scene of a bride and groom for their oldest grandson who is getting married soon.  She used Aspen and Walnut for the intarsia.  The grandson’s sister is also getting a bride and groom intarsia piece for her wedding in 6 months.  She finished it with spray-on lacquer.

Judy also showed four intarsia welcome signs that had season themes for Spring, Summer, Fall and Winter.  She used a variety of scrap wood from their shop including cedar, purple heart, mahogany, ash and yellow heart.  They were also finished with spray on lacquer.

Gary Bennett showed turned Christmas ornaments turned from mahogany, walnut, box elder and poplar. He finished all with poly.

Gary also showed more than 20 porch balusters and a pair stair posts he turned for a porch.  He had sought support at a previous meeting and decided to turn them himself.  They look great!

Gary Runyon showed a slotted sliding lid box.  The lid was made from eucalyptus and the sides from cherry.  It was finished with walnut antique oil.  It was the first time Gary had worked with eucalyptus and he noted it is very hard wood.

 Darrell Albert showed an antique bowl and passed it around to the members to see if they could identify the wood.  Not sure anyone could successfully identify the wood. Darrell showed three chittum burl spoons that he finished with walnut oil.

 Richard Gulley showed a SawStop safety cartridge that fired into his blade recently.  He said it nicked his finger but didn’t draw blood.  He noted he’s had the saw for more than five years and had two finger-saving incidents!

 Internet Links of Interest

For a plethora of wood related videos check out Wood magazine’s YouTube channel:

https://www.youtube.com/user/Wood/videos 

Carver’s Corner

The Splinter Carvers continue to meet first and third Saturdays of the month from 8:30 am to 10:30 am (whether Jim’s there or not).  The shop is located at 201 Jolliffe Acres Ln, Tullahoma. Tools and wood are available at the meetings, just bring yourself and try your hand at carving!

Sweeping Up

I found several funnies from Pinterest this month. I’ll share a few of them:

Submissions to the newsletter are more than welcomed. Send funnies, tips, or other content that may be of interest and you may see it in a future edition of .

Newsletter Information

Splinters is a publication of the Tennessee Valley Woodworkers. For submissions, email editor, Richard Gulley (rgulley@utsi.edu .)

Newsletter Vol 36 / Issue 09

Greetings

For the “What I’m Thankful For” series, I’m going to re-plow some old ground. I think one of the first things I wrote about was good friends- especially those in the wood club. During the past several weeks I’ve come to realize how special it is to work with friends of like mind. Several came to my shop a few weeks ago and cut out parts for several bookcases for the Literacy Council. Vince was the job foreman and Paul Jalbert, Jim Joliffe, Mickey Knowles and myself made up the crew. The parts were taken to Henry Davis’ shop for assembly the next week. I was under the weather and stopped by just to see how they were doing. Henry Davis and Larry Wendland were in charge of quality control and Dennis Finney (good man) joined the crew above to assemble the bookcases. So, get together with a fellow club member and work on a project together. Working together turns acquaintances into friends and friends into friends for life.

Now let’s get started with Splinters!

August Meeting

We had a great time at the Annual August Auction. Over $1100 was raised for the club. The proceeds are used to lower the cost of seminars (and dues) as well as helping with community projects.

More info on dues coming at the September meeting.

September Meeting

We will have our next meeting on Tuesday, September 21st from 6:30-8:30.  Our program will be on segmented turning by Don Farr of Huntsville.

Our Fall picnic will be September 25th at Fall’s Mill. We will start setting up at 11:00 and eat lunch at 12:00. The club will provide BBQ and drinks and members should bring a favorite side or dessert for a fabulous potluck meal!!
Also, the mill and out buildings/displays (including the “new” schoolhouse) will be open for you to explore!
For directions and more information about Falls Mill, go to https://fallsmill.com

August Show & Tell

Here are the items that were shown in last month’s Zoom/Live meeting. See pictures in the online version.

Carl Blumenthal made a Man Cave stone sign out of sandstone quartzite for the evening’s auction.  This rock was personally quarried by him in Wisconsin and brought to TN. It is sandstone that transformed to quartzite. This rock is sand blasted with Aluminum Oxide sand. This graphic is unique to Carl and the first time he had ever had to do this, in which he had to blast the cave into the rock first which is all backwards from what he usually does. Usually, he blasts the words and stuff into the rock, not the surroundings. Then he had to paint the outside of the rock to give the cave look. After that he had to mask everything off except the TV, man, dish, table, and verbiage. Then he came back and blasted all that and painted it. This rock, after painted, gets washed to get all the remaining sand out of the rock.  Carl noted: To whomever acquires the rock: This rock can go outside or inside since he used a rock and concrete sealer to seal the pores to help prevent freezing water from splitting the rock or chipping out the paint.

Darren Earle showed a ~14” diameter box elder bowl that was initially turned by Tom Church in 2010.  Darren finished it in 2021 and was providing it for the auction.  The beautiful contrast of blond wood with red coloration was evident (again) after Darren turned it down recently. It is finished with paint sealer.

Jeremy Price showed a ~7” diameter cherry bowl that he turned early in his turning experience.  It was finished in Odie’s Oil and Odie’s Wax.

Chuck Taylor showed a maple and cherry music/jewelry box he made for the auction.  It has maple sides and bottom with a cherry lid and splines for the box sides. He finished it with lacquer.

Judy Bennett showed an intarsia flower she created early in her intarsia experience.  She used walnut, and maple for her project and finished it with spray-on poly.

Gary Bennett showed an oak bird house he made for the auction. He finished with poly.

Tom Gill showed turned carver’s mallet made from Black Locust and finished with wax.

Gary Runyon showed a turned, threaded acorn box made of a dogwood base and a cherry top. He also showed a turned, threaded needle box that had a wood-burned and painted flower design. His third piece was a cherry box with a slotted sliding lid.  All three were provided for the auction.

Darrell Albert made a chittum burl dish for the auction and finished it with walnut oil.

Clay Cooper brought a “Happy Campers” sign made of live edge walnut and sand blasted, painted, and sealed by Carl Blumenthal. Clay’s son takes it with him camping.

Jim Jolliffe showed a cottonwood bark Victorian Smiling Santa carving. He sprayed with 2 coats of rattle-can satin lacquer, added acrylic paint highlights and then sprayed it with two more coats of lacquer.

Internet Links of Interest

Wood magazine has a web page that recommends a wide variety of tools that are good quality yet affordable. 

Ever heard of a GRABO? I think I like it!! Check out these Izzy Swann YouTube videos –
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dNxj8_S4inQ

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sYwtIWYpPvQ&t=605s

Carver’s Corner

The Splinter Carvers continue to meet first and third Saturdays of the month from 8:30 am to 10:30 am (whether Jim’s there or not).  The shop is located at 201 Jolliffe Acres Ln, Tullahoma. Tools and wood are available at the meetings, just bring yourself and try your hand at carving!

Pete Miller sent this carving tip:
carving_tip

and this unique colored pencil “carving:

 

Sweeping Up

From Pinterest:

From Tom Gillard:

Watch out for Splinters.

Submissions to the newsletter are more than welcomed. Send funnies, tips, or other content that may be of interest and you may see it in a future edition of Splinters!

 

Newsletter Vol 36 / Issue 08

Greetings

Thanks to Pete Miller for sending me these two points having to do with persistence (from Charles Stanley’s website.) I’m going to use them for my “What I’m Thankful For“ series.

  1. Learn the difference between being a failure and experiencing failure in life. —
    You’ve all heard of the all-purpose cleaner Formula 409. It’s named that because that’s how many attempts were made before the inventors were satisfied with the results. What if they had given up at #408?
  2. Learn that encountering difficulties and tests does not automatically mean we’re to change direction. —
    Once you’ve set a goal, focus on the end result. You may have to occasionally change course, but keep your eye on the destination.

The comments after the two points above are mine and, generally, hold true. I’m thankful that persistence usually overcomes difficulties. However, there are always exceptions. Case in point – “If at first you don’t succeed, skydiving may not be for you.”

Now let’s get started with Splinters!

July Meeting

The July meeting was my first meeting back. We had to meet in the library instead of H111. There were some difficulties getting folk hooked up to the Zoom meeting but Jim kept calm and worked things out. All in all, it felt good to meet with fellow woodworkers. See you August 17th.

LIVE/Zoom Meeting August 17

We will have our next meeting on Tuesday, August 17th from 6:30-8:30.  Our program will be the Annual Auction to benefit the club treasury. So look around the shop for duplicate tools or items you’ve made and we’ll have a great sale! The proceeds help to keep our dues low and enables the club to assist with various community projects.

Please send Show & Tell pictures and information requested below to the email address below. This will save time getting pictures ready for the meeting.

By Sunday, August 15th – Provide pictures and descriptions of your Show & Tell items to tnvalleywoodworkers@gmail.com 
Descriptive information for each photo/related set of photos should include:

Woodworker Name: 
Project Name:
Wood(s)/Materials Used: 
Finishes applied:
Lessons Learned (if any): 

July Show & Tell

Here are the items that were shown in last month’s Zoom/Live meeting. See pictures in the online version.

Mickey Knowles showed a spalted hackberry bowl he turned. He showed a hackberry cheese tray and glass dome.  He showed a walnut hanging blanket stand.  All were finished in sanding sealer and lacquer.  The walnut blanket stand also had walnut stain.  He showed a roughly 2 inch thick piece of stump he tried to turn into a bowl.  After rough turning, he put the piece in a bag with the chips.  When he went to retrieve it, the warping and splitting were beyond repair. Several suggested he simply sign his name to it as a unique, one-of-a-kind piece.  Another suggested adding a clock movement and hanging it on the wall.

Chuck Taylor showed a finished pepper mill and one in progress made from spalted maple. He also showed a live edge bowl made from apple wood with beautiful grain.  All pieces were finished in walnut oil and wax.

John Hartin showed some four beautiful lidded bowls he recently turned. One lidded bowl was solid cherry.  He discussed the form of turning lidded bowls and “The Golden Ratio” for turning vases and bowls.  The second lidded bowl was made from maple with a dark textured rim around the bowl body.  The third bowl was made of a cherry bottom and a different type of wood top with a very unique textured top (made of glue and tissue paper, aka “toilet paper and snot”).  The fourth lidded bowl was made of a blond wood with a natural finish. The bowls were finished with a cabinet grade lacquer then buffed out.

Judy Bennett showed an intarsia barn and birdhouse she made.  She emphasized that she uses a large wood variety to match her project’s features and that she rarely stains any wood with other than natural stain.  Once exception were the barn windows and open door.  She stained those a dark walnut color to provide the shadow.  She used walnut, mahogany, poplar and cedar for her projects and finished them with spray-on poly.

Bob Brown showed a picture book of woodworking projects he built for his kids and grandkids. The kids and grandkids made the scrapbook for him to show his work. The projects were too large to bring to show and tell and scattered throughout his children and grandchildren’s homes.  The book’s entry included pictures of him as a youngster, “The little boy from Jackson County”.  The projects were of large variety and all beautiful!
(Pic1, Pic2, Pic3, Pic4, Pic5, Pic6, Pic7, Pic8, Pic9, Pic10, Pic11, Pic12, Pic13, Pic14, Pic15)

Jim Jolliffe showed a finished cottonwood bark carving of Christ with Crown of Thorns he carved as part of a Zoom Seminar with instructor Alec LaCasse.  He added honey locust thorns to the carved crown vines as carving small, fragile thorns was impossible (in his mind!). He sprayed with 2 coats of rattle-can satin polyurethane.

Fred Heltsey brought an “Impossible Triangle” he and his grandkids made during their stay at “Camp Jewel’s”.  The triangle is an optical illusion made of three pieces of wood that are not connected as a triangle.  It is quick to make but challenging to position so it looks like a continuously outlined triangle.
(Pic1, Pic2, Pic3, Pic4, Pic5, Pic6)

Gary Bennett asked for support to make 18 identical balusters for a friend’s railing as he didn’t have a duplicator lathe.  The membership provided Dean Lutes’ name to Gary as a possible solution.

Larry Wendland mentioned that a vendor named Starbond makes reasonably priced high-quality CA glue and guarantees it for 2 years if kept in the refrigerator below 40 degrees.

Internet Links of Interest

  • Fine Woodworking has compiled a plethora of articles about hand planes on their site.

https://www.finewoodworking.com/project-guides/handplanes

Note: There may be a limit to how much you can view without an account.

  • Wanna see a $40,000 puzzle pedestal? It’s probably not overpriced!

https://www.finewoodworking.com/2021/07/12/craig-thibodeaus-holy-grail-puzzle-cabinet

Carver’s Corner

The Splinter Carvers continue to meet first and third Saturdays of the month from 8:30 am to 10:30 am (whether Jim’s there or not).  The shop is located at 201 Jolliffe Acres Ln, Tullahoma. Tools and wood are available at the meetings, just bring yourself and try your hand at carving!

 Sweeping Up

From Pinterest:

    

Submissions to the newsletter are more than welcomed. Send funnies, tips, or other content that may be of interest and you may see it in a future edition of SPLINTERS!

 

Newsletter Vol 36 / Issue 07

Greetings

Have you ever heard the phrase “And this too shall pass”? Well, that phrase is what I’m thankful for this month. It seems we’ve been going through more than our share of aches, pains, and doctor visits lately. So, we fall back on “This too shall pass.” Like Tennessee weather, if you don’t like it, just wait; it will change.

That frame of mind can help get us through some tough times, if we just hold on. But, like every coin, there are two sides. What if you’re going through good times? Unfortunately, “This too shall pass” still applies. So, appreciate the good times while they’re here.

I’ll wrap this up with a quote from Jake Hess – “No matter what you’re going through, it’s either going to get better, get worse, or stay about the same.”

Now let’s get started with Splinters!

 June Meeting

I really hated missing the first face to face meeting. I had worked in the garden for two days (it had been wet for two weeks.) I couldn’t move for a couple days. From all reports I’ve gotten, a good time was had by all.

LIVE/Zoom Meeting July 20

We will have our next meeting on Tuesday, July 20th from 6:30-8:30.  For the program Gary Runyon will demonstrate how he makes threaded needle boxes.

Please send pictures and information requested below to the email address below. This will save time getting pictures ready for Show & Tell.

By Sunday, July 18th – Provide pictures and descriptions of your Show & Tell items to tnvalleywoodworkers@gmail.com 
Descriptive information for each photo/related set of photos should include:

Woodworker Name: 
Project Name:
Wood(s)/Materials Used: 
Finishes applied:
Lessons Learned (if any): 

June Show & Tell

Here are the items that were shown in last month’s Live/Zoom meeting. 

Chris Sauder noted Mickey Knowles told him he needed to get a lathe.  So he did.  He showed some beautiful bowls made of Hackberry, Spalted Hackberry, Birch and Leland Cypress.   All were finished with sanding sealer.  He also showed a finished ukulele he made for one of the grandkids from a kit.  He inserts a penny in the headstock from the year of construction. He wood burns his initials on the back of the headstock.  The Ukulele was finished with a water-based stain hand hand-rubbed wax.

Karen Browning showed a Red Bud Vase with natural edges and features.  She finished it in 3 coats of water-based poly.  She also showed a turned tea-light candlestick of unknown, unfinished wood.

Gary Runyon showed a sample of the 20 turned and threaded needle boxes he made from hickory, pecan, bloodwood, mesquite, and bocote rosewood. He finished them with micro-crystalline shellac lacquer.  He showed interesting threaded Acorn Shaped Boxes with dogwood bases and textured cherry tops finished with Doctor’s Woodshop Walnut Oil and Microcrystal Paste Wax.  He also showed an example of the 9 storage boxes he made from a variety of cherry, oak and walnut and finished with MinWax Antique Oil.  Gary also showed a Tansu Style Box he made with Ambrosia Maple using a woodworking plan.  Gary has made several of these interesting storage boxes. He finished the Tansu style box with MinWax Antique Oil.

Darrel Albert showed three pieces made from Chittum Burl and finished in walnut oil.  The two “ladle” type pieces were made from a tree that had 42 burls on it!  The burl dish came from a chittum stump. (Pic1, Pic2, Pic3)

Geoff Roehm showed a handy router jig for cutting accurate scarf joints for guitar necks.

Pete Miller sent pictures of watercolor painting tracings he did June 6th. One will stay black and white and Pete will add will add flesh tones, fingernail color and do the robe on the other. He used a design that he traced on the paper for the painting. He is not free-handing this stuff yet like real artists do. He has two on-line courses to do to learn how to good watercolor paintings. Pete wanted to do painting as one of the club members at the spoon carving workshop said it would enhance his wood burnings. COVID and a Christmas gift gave him the chance to try painting on paper and wood.

Loyd Ackerman showed a great variety of the work he produced over the pandemic period.  He showed a variety of wood turnings he made during 2020-2021.  He showed a walnut serving tray he made in Nov 20.  In Oct 20, Loyd made a bean bag toss (aka corn hole) game for his son who is an avid Alabama fan.  He made a sofa table out of cherry for his daughter in Aug 20.  He made a walnut and poplar side table.  He noted the poplar choice was because he ran out of walnut.  He glazed/finished/repeated the poplar to match the walnut and felt over many iterations the wood colors matched well.  He showed a custom child study desk built in Dec 20 to his 9-year-old granddaughter’s specification to support her remote learning.  The desk is made of maple with a lacquer finish. He also showed a butler’s tray.

Darren Earle showed some lumber he’s been milling since retiring from his previous profession and buying a portable saw mill.  He showed some large slabs of ash he milled and then cut into bowl blanks.  The ash tree was over 250 years old and the “limb” was 29” in diameter!  The limb had fallen off but the tree was still standing and the State Arborist came out to document the tree (after some coaxing…).  Darren showed some raised garden bed boxes he made for his wife.  The bottoms were made from black locust and the sides from red cedar. (Pic1, Pic2)  He told of a lady who had a log cabin and tobacco barn on her property who wanted a mantle for the cabin’s fireplace.  She asked for walnut but Darren suggested that she use some of the American Chestnut logs loose on the porch as it would match the cabin.  She agreed.  He took a log home and milled it and noticed it was not American Chestnut, but Poplar! The difference in this poplar log was that it had over 130 growth rings in the slab!  He did some research and noted poplar used to grow very slowly.  One can’t find that type of poplar anymore.  His final pictures were of a maple burl in raw form and the burl on the lathe.  He noted that the “bumps” in the burl were made from mistletoe “haustorium” that grows between the maple cells to attach itself and nourish itself by siphoning off some of the maple tree’s water.  The mistletoe does not hurt the tree.  It does provide very interesting effects on the maple burl.

Jim Jolliffe showed a finished cottonwood bark carving of a native American in a wolf headdress that he had sprayed with three coats of rattle can lacquer then added acrylic highlights.  Once highlighted, he sprayed with matte lacquer and applied Watco’s Liquid Wax (natural color) and buffed it out. (Pic1, Pic2, Pic3)

John Hartin showed two magnolia bowls he had turned. (Pic1, Pic2)

Internet Links of Interest

This is not a woodworking link but may be of interest to any computer wannabees. In the course of compiling the newsletter, I had to extract pictures from the PowerPoint Jim sent me. The tedious way is one by one. But at the site below there’s a video that explains how to extract them all at once. Huge time saver.

https://puffingston.com/blog/extract-images-powerpoint-insertion-prezi-digital-resources/

From WOOD Magazine-
A video showing the differences between red and white oak. And why one is better than the other for outdoor projects.
https://www.woodmagazine.com/video/red-vs-white-oak 

Carver’s Corner

The Splinter Carvers continue to meet first and third Saturdays of the month from 8:30 am to 10:30 am (whether Jim’s there or not).  The shop is located at 201 Jolliffe Acres Ln, Tullahoma. Tools and wood are available at the meetings, just bring yourself and try your hand at carving!

Sweeping Up

From Pinterest:

Submissions to the newsletter are more than welcomed. Send funnies, tips, or other content that may be of interest and you may see it in a future edition of SPLINTERS.

Newsletter Vol 36 / Issue 06

Greetings

As you read this you will note that it’s late. I didn’t realize 3rd Tuesday was early this month (as early as it can possibly be – the 15th.) So I’m sitting here on Thursday the 10th composing a newsletter.

I don’t know if I included a “What I’m Thankful For” item last month, but here’s an unusual one for you – I’m thankful that I’m Soooo BUSY! I was thinking the other day how nice it would be to have nothing to do. Then I realized having nothing to do would mean no friends and neighbors that knew they could call on me for help. No church property or church family that needed my attention. Or possibly not busy because my health did not allow me to do the things I love to do. The final reason I’m glad I have a long To-do list – Why should God leave you hanging around if you don’t have anything to do?

Now let’s get started with Splinters!

Great News From UTSI

This month Tennessee Valley Woodworkers will be meeting face to in H111 (as well as the online Zoom meeting.)! It’s been a long time (over a year) but things are getting back to normal. Thanks to Governor Lee and the folks at UTSI for opening these facilities and allowing us to meet again. Looking forward to seeing you all.

LIVE/Zoom Meeting June 15

We will have our next meeting on Tuesday, June 15th from 6:30-8:30.  The program will be a Super Show & Tell. You can bring new items or things you’ve show in past newsletters and Zoom meetings. We’d like to see the items up close and personal. Please sent pictures and requested information to the email address below. This will save time getting pictures ready for Show & Tell.

You can join the Zoom meeting by following the instructions below:

  1. By Sunday, June 13th – Provide pictures and descriptions of your Show & Tell items to tnvalleywoodworkers@gmail.com 
    Descriptive information for each photo/related set of photos should include:

Woodworker Name: 
Project Name:
Wood(s)/Materials Used: 
Finishes applied:
Lessons Learned (if any): 

May Show & Tell

Here are the items that were shown in last month’s Zoom meeting. 

Gary Runyon showed homemade hand planes he made from hard rock maple, cherry and Texas ebony and finished with Minwax Antique Oil Finish.  Most of the plane blades were made from O1 tool steel and hardened by Gary.  He noted that tool steel can be purchased through several online tool steel sources including McMaster-Carr and others.  He offered to help fellow club members with this project.  Please contact Gary if interested.

Peter Hunter showed a Wig Stand he turned for donation to a Chemotherapy Patient.  He used hard maple for the stand’s base and top and cherry for the spindle.  He applied three coats of polymerized linseed oil as the finish.  He explained that the polymerized linseed oil repels moisture from the wig and doesn’t leech oil into the wig.  As part of the project, Peter also made a #1 Morse Taper to hold his turnings.  He had a jig to turn the #1 Morse taper exactly to the plan form. (Pic1, Pic2, Pic3)

Internet Links of Interest

Pete Miller sent me this link for inexpensive pen kits –
http://www.penkitsmall.com/ – However, this is a Chinese website and they ask you to register as a member before you can browse the site. We’ll let Pet tell us more about his experience with theses folk.

Carver’s Corner

The Splinter Carvers continue to meet first and third Saturdays of the month from 8:30 am to 10:30 am (whether Jim’s there or not).  The shop is located at 201 Jolliffe Acres Ln, Tullahoma. Tools and wood are available at the meetings, just bring yourself and try your hand at carving!

 Sweeping Up

From Pinterest:

Short n sweet, but that’s all for this month.
Watch out for SPLINTERS!

Submissions to the newsletter are more than welcomed. Send funnies, tips, or other content that may be of interest and you may see it in a future edition of SPLINTERS.

Newsletter Vol 36 / Issue 05

Greetings

This newsletter creeped up on me. First it was more than two weeks away and now it’s past due. If time flies when you’re having fun, I must be having a hilarious time.

My monthly “What I’m Thankful For” item is a no brainer – Friends. Some of my favorite friends are a direct result of belonging to Tennessee Valley Woodworkers. I’ve kept my sanity through a very strange year by working with good folk like Jack Kincella, Vince Zaccardi, Henry Davis, Dean Lutes, and many more. I’ll be glad when we can meet face to face again.

Now let’s get started with Splinters!

Great News From UTSI

Starting next month Tennessee Valley Woodworkers will be able to meet face to face in H111 again! It’s been a long time (over a year) but things may be getting back to normal. Thanks to Governor Lee and the folks at UTSI for opening these facilities and allowing us to meet again. I’m sure there will be more news during the Zoom meeting.

Zoom Meeting May 18

We will have our next Zoom Meeting on Tuesday, May 18th from 6:30-8:30.  The program will be three short videos evolving from last month’s meeting – videos on a simple work bench plan, how-to sharpen hand plane blades and How to Build a Krenov Style Block Plane.

Please join us by following the instructions below to:

  1. By Sunday, April 20th – Provide pictures and descriptions of your Show & Tell items to tnvalleywoodworkers@gmail.com 
    Descriptive information for each photo/related set of photos should include:

Woodworker Name: 
Project Name:
Wood(s)/Materials Used: 
Finishes applied:
Lessons Learned (if any): 

 April Show & Tell

Here are the items that were shown in last month’s Zoom meeting.

Pete Miller showed pens he’s turned from acrylics and finished with one step acrylic friction polish.  Pete noted during his lessons learned that turning acrylics is different than wood, especially if wood has been placed in the acrylic. The wood seemed not to be completely adhered to the acrylic material and he had a blowout even though he applied CA glue to try and stop blowout. He learned about blowout when drilling the blank even though he used a bit designed for acrylic.  The blowout occurred when the bit went through the acrylic. Pete changed to a brad point bit and had no blow out.  He also noted when you are turning a pen and start to take the acrylic down to the bushing size GO SLOW because when you start to round the blank on the ends to meet the bushing size it could grab and cause the blank to chip. Lastly, Pete learned keep your tools really sharp as it makes a difference and once the blank is rounded you start to get nice acrylic ribbons coming off the blank. During the Q&A, fellow turners supported the use of very sharp carbide turning tools for acrylics.

Loyd Ackerman showed a TV Credenza, 66”L x 18”D x 22”H made of Oak Plywood and solid Oak.  He applied Min-Wax Golden Oak Stain and Satin Lacquer for the finish.  Loyd recommended for finishing that a period of several days between staining and applying lacquer to allow the stain solvent to evaporate. Loyd shared a lesson learned when using rare earth magnets for latches.  Don’t forget to confer with a Club member for advice when matching magnets on the door and the carcass frame “catch”.  The Tip from Advisor/Wood Club Member Chuck Taylor: Be sure to watch magnet polarity, so the magnets hold the door instead of repelling the door.  Critical information to know before gluing the magnets in the door and the carcass frame!

Richard Gulley and Vince Zaccardi collaborated on a pair of oak Mission Style Tables for use on the recently remodeled UTSI Auditorium Stage.  Loyd Ackerman assisted with the table plans.  The stain used was Mohawk Honey recommended by Jack Kincella.   Jack applied a glaze to cover some worm holes/tracks and sprayed with a satin finish. The Mohawk Honey is an oil-based stain and works very well.  It has a reducer if the user wants to lighten the stain.  Mohawk has a tremendous shade variety and, while costly, it is very easy to apply.  Table construction was basically mortise and tenon done on a pantorouter. The project was started long ago (about the time we did the auditorium hand rails.) But there were delays then COVID and, well, that says it all. Richard planned to deliver the first of next week.

Internet Links of Interest

Pete Miller sent me this – Interesting CA glue product. Never saw it before and thought the club might be interested. 

https://fb.watch/531XFIz9Hi/

Several links from Kreg’s Build Something website.

One more link. How would you like to have a dart board where you never miss? Take a look at this – you’ll be amazed! (Or maybe I have a low threshold of amazement.)

https://www.markroberbuildinstructions.com/auto-bullseye

TVW YouTube Channel

Sorry I haven’t followed through on the video posting. I thought the problem was not enough hours in the day. I’ve had to revise that theory. I think it’s a case of not having the endurance to take advantage of the hours available.

 Here’s the link to our channel –

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCCBMvw434qQ5ND7wjeWat3w/

Carver’s Corner

The Splinter Carvers continue to meet first and third Saturdays of the month from 8:30 am to 10:30 am (whether Jim’s there or not).  The shop is located at 201 Jolliffe Acres Ln, Tullahoma. Tools and wood are available at the meetings, just bring yourself and try your hand at carving!

 Sweeping Up

This from Jim Jolliffe:

“You might be a woodcarver if you strop your knives while you wait for the blood to stop flowing.”

I found these two on Pinterest –

That’s all for this month. Watch out for SPLINTERS!

Submissions to the newsletter are more than welcomed. Send funnies, tips, or other content that may be of interest and you may see it in a future edition of SPLINTERS.

Newsletter Vol 36 / Issue 04

Greetings

If you read the local newspapers, you all probably know I’ve been a little more than occupied. I’m filing city politics under “This too shall pass.” I’m also practicing being silent. I can already be silent in seven different languages!

As to my “What I’m Thankful For” resolution, I’m thankful for all I learned in VBS and Sunday School when I was a child – God is Great, God is Good (All the time!)

Now let’s get started with Splinters!

Zoom Meeting April 20

We will have our next Zoom Meeting on Tuesday, April 20th from 6:30-8:30.  The program will be on hand cut dovetails.

Please join us by following the instructions below to:

  1. By Sunday, April 20th – Provide pictures and descriptions of your Show & Tell items to tnvalleywoodworkers@gmail.com 
    Descriptive information for each photo/related set of photos should include:

Woodworker Name: 
Project Name:
Wood(s)/Materials Used: 
Finishes applied:
Lessons Learned (if any): 

March Show & Tell

Here are the items that were shown in last month’s Zoom meeting.

Karen Browning showed various maple and cherry turnings she completed at Doyle McConnell’s shop.  The turnings were finished with lacquer. (Pic1, Pic2, Pic3)

Denis Urbanczik presented four projects he recently completed.  The first was a compost bin storage container made of Eastern Cedar and finished in teak oil.  The second was a hard pine sofa frame refinishing project. Finish was not yet applied.  Denis noted the effort took a lot of paint stripper to remove the original finish. That takes us to the next small piece he made/invented — scraped finish collecting tool. PS: Hats off to all the restorers out there, this was a lot of work! Denis used a piece of pallet oak and old ballast casing.  He finished the oak piece with teak oil. It performed well!  The fourth and final piece was an upgrade to his router table fence.  He replaced the melamine fence with quarter sawn oak and finished it with mineral oil.

Loyd Ackerman Oak Box with CNC V-Carved Name “Wendell” in Top.  The box is 8.5” l x 5.25” w x 4.25” h and constructed of short thin Red Oak (maybe) wood pieces provided by Wendell.  The finish is rattle can lacquer.  His lesson learned is to smile when someone gives you inferior wood

Internet Links of Interest

I only have one link for you this month, but it’s AMAZING!

https://archive.org/

You can search the history of over 555 billion web pages on the Internet. You know, those web sites that used to be there but aren’t anymore. Even better, there’s books (I saw a lot of genealogy stuff), music (I listened to some Grateful Dead – there’s whole concerts). There’s just too much too even tell you about. WARNING! This site may connect you to a black hole – it may be hard to return to the real time/space continuum.

TVW YouTube Channel

Sorry I haven’t followed through on the video posting. I seem to be running out of day before I run out of “To Do’s”.

 Here’s the link to our channel –

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCCBMvw434qQ5ND7wjeWat3w/

 Carver’s Corner

The Splinter Carvers continue to meet first and third Saturdays of the month from 8:30 am to 10:30 am (whether Jim’s there or not).  The shop is located at 201 Jolliffe Acres Ln, Tullahoma. Tools and wood are available at the meetings, just bring yourself and try your hand at carving!

 Sweeping Up

I’ve found that no matter where I stand in the kitchen, that’s where my wife needs to be. With that in mind, I submit this bit of wisdom –

Submissions to the newsletter are more than welcomed. Send funnies, tips, or other content that may be of interest and you may see it in a future edition of SPLINTERS.